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http://www.thebostonchannel.com/education/7082947/detail.html
WASHINGTON -- Science and math have zoomed to the top of the nation's education agenda. Yet Amanda Cook, a parent of two school-age girls, can't quite see the urgency.

"In Maine, there aren't many jobs that scream out 'math and science,"' said Cook, who lives in Etna, in the central part of the state. Yes, both topics are important, but "most parents are saying you're better off going to school for something there's a big need for."

Nationwide, a new poll shows, many parents are content with the science and math education their children get -- a starkly different view than that held by national leaders.

Fifty-seven percent of parents say "things are fine" with the amount of math and science being taught in their child's public school. High school parents seem particularly content -- 70 percent say their child gets the right amount of science and math.

Students aren't too worried, either, according to the poll released Tuesday by Public Agenda, a public opinion research group that tracks education trends.

Only half of children in grades six to 12 say that understanding sciences and having strong math skills are essential for them to succeed after high school.

This comes as congressional leaders, governors, corporate executives and top scientists have called for schools to raise the rigor and amount of math and science in school. In his State of the Union address, President Bush made the matter a national priority.

Yet where public officials and employers see slipping production in the sciences as a threat to the nation's economy, parents and students don't share that urgency.

"There's energy and leadership at the top, but there is a task to be done in getting parents and kids to understand some of the ideas," said Jean Johnson, executive president of Public Agenda. "You can do a lot from the top, but you can't do everything. Schools are local. The leadership needs to reach out and help the public understand the challenge."

This week, Bush said, "We can't be the leading country in the world in science and technology unless we educate scientists and young mathematicians." A panel of top scientists and business leaders has warned "the scientific and technical building blocks of our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gaining strength."

As for parents and students? In theory, they say, more math and science would be good.

For example, 62 percent of parents say it is crucial for most of today's students to learn high-level math, like advanced algebra and calculus.

The story changes, though, when parents talk specifically about their kids' schools, and when the children relay their own experiences.

Students put a lack of science and math near the bottom of problems they see at school. They are much more worried about bad language, cheating or the pressure for good grades.

Most parents, meanwhile, say their kids are getting a better education than they did. Only 32 percent of parents say their child's school should teach more math and science.

If anything, parents are less worried about math and science these days -- not more.

In 1994, 52 percent of parents considered a lack of math and science in their local schools to be a serious problem. Now, only 32 percent say the same thing. During that time, states ramped up standards and testing, which seems to have affected parents' views.

The findings are based on telephone interviews with a nationally random sample of 1,342 public school students in grades six to 12, and of 1,379 parents of children in public school. The interviews were done between Oct. 30 and Dec. 29. The margin of sampling error was plus or minus 3.5 percentage points for the students and 4 percentage points for the parents.
 

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Good Over Evil said:
http://www.thebostonchannel.com/education/7082947/detail.html
WASHINGTON -- Science and math have zoomed to the top of the nation's education agenda. Yet Amanda Cook, a parent of two school-age girls, can't quite see the urgency.

"In Maine, there aren't many jobs that scream out 'math and science,"' said Cook, who lives in Etna, in the central part of the state. Yes, both topics are important, but "most parents are saying you're better off going to school for something there's a big need for."

Nationwide, a new poll shows, many parents are content with the science and math education their children get -- a starkly different view than that held by national leaders.

Fifty-seven percent of parents say "things are fine" with the amount of math and science being taught in their child's public school. High school parents seem particularly content -- 70 percent say their child gets the right amount of science and math.

Students aren't too worried, either, according to the poll released Tuesday by Public Agenda, a public opinion research group that tracks education trends.

Only half of children in grades six to 12 say that understanding sciences and having strong math skills are essential for them to succeed after high school.

This comes as congressional leaders, governors, corporate executives and top scientists have called for schools to raise the rigor and amount of math and science in school. In his State of the Union address, President Bush made the matter a national priority.

Yet where public officials and employers see slipping production in the sciences as a threat to the nation's economy, parents and students don't share that urgency.

"There's energy and leadership at the top, but there is a task to be done in getting parents and kids to understand some of the ideas," said Jean Johnson, executive president of Public Agenda. "You can do a lot from the top, but you can't do everything. Schools are local. The leadership needs to reach out and help the public understand the challenge."

This week, Bush said, "We can't be the leading country in the world in science and technology unless we educate scientists and young mathematicians." A panel of top scientists and business leaders has warned "the scientific and technical building blocks of our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gaining strength."

As for parents and students? In theory, they say, more math and science would be good.

For example, 62 percent of parents say it is crucial for most of today's students to learn high-level math, like advanced algebra and calculus.

The story changes, though, when parents talk specifically about their kids' schools, and when the children relay their own experiences.

Students put a lack of science and math near the bottom of problems they see at school. They are much more worried about bad language, cheating or the pressure for good grades.

Most parents, meanwhile, say their kids are getting a better education than they did. Only 32 percent of parents say their child's school should teach more math and science.

If anything, parents are less worried about math and science these days -- not more.

In 1994, 52 percent of parents considered a lack of math and science in their local schools to be a serious problem. Now, only 32 percent say the same thing. During that time, states ramped up standards and testing, which seems to have affected parents' views.

The findings are based on telephone interviews with a nationally random sample of 1,342 public school students in grades six to 12, and of 1,379 parents of children in public school. The interviews were done between Oct. 30 and Dec. 29. The margin of sampling error was plus or minus 3.5 percentage points for the students and 4 percentage points for the parents.

well its easier in some countries
math question taken from any crazy country :
If billy straps 2.5kilos of C4 around his belly and triggers it right after lunch in a busy city street; How many people will he kill?
 

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If parents are dumb enough to think that some basic education in math and science is not important for everybody, regardless of vocation, then they've lost credibility with me in determining what's important for their kids.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
01silber said:
well its easier in some countries
math question taken from any crazy country :
If billy straps 2.5kilos of C4 around his belly and triggers it right after lunch in a busy city street; How many people will he kill?
Um...riiiight....Meanwhile the Asians and Europeans are pulling ahead of us in numbers of science/math degrees and education in general
 

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If the story was set in Washington, why is the lady talking about Maine?

Who the F0ck cares about Maine? The best things to come out of Maine are the lobsters.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It doesn't matter where you live in this nation, you can be a math/science major anywhere

"WASHINGTON -- Science and math have zoomed to the top of the nation's education agenda." - that makes sense and that mindset is set in washington
 

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Good Over Evil said:
Um...riiiight....Meanwhile the Asians and Europeans are pulling ahead of us in numbers of science/math degrees and education in general
meanwhile? where the hell have you been??? this is nothing new
 

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I find the attitudes of parents that think math and science aren't that important quite disturbing. I hope these attitudes aren't carried over into our school systems. Granted, many of us don't use a lot of math and science but I think they need to be taught to help develop a child's analytical abilities. If I had to do it all over again I would have paid a lot more attention in both of these areas.
 

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My high school math curriculum in Malaysia far exceeded any of the college-level math classes I took in the United States.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ripsnort said:
And exactly what the hell is GOE doing to make it better beside bitching about it? :rofl: :dunno: :angel:
...if I went to all your posts and tagged every single thing you "bitch" about it'd take me days.

your comments are ridiculous
 

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Good Over Evil said:
...if I went to all your posts and tagged every single thing you "bitch" about it'd take me days.

your comments are ridiculous
but at LEAST I do have some optimist posts! Where are yours? :rofl:

So far today:
Parents are stoopid
Big corporations are eeeeevil..
"Owned" is stooooo-pid
Olympic ads about alcohol are stooooo-pid!

Come on Francis, lighten up! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I find it funny how you just abandon arguments and hop onto another one as soon as you fail with the previous one....2nd time you've done that today
 

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Good Over Evil said:
I find it funny how you just abandon arguments and hop onto another one as soon as you fail with the previous one....2nd time you've done that today
eh?:dunno:

I find it funny how you changed the subject...what are you going to do about parents who don't think math is important?
 

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Good Over Evil said:
Um...riiiight....Meanwhile the Asians and Europeans are pulling ahead of us in numbers of science/math degrees and education in general
Meanwhile, any Joe can start an expedite company that sells goods designed and engineered there and make a killing off of it. Even a "small" campany can do well over $500 MIL in sales doing this sort of thing. Yup, America keeps on getting richer as the rest of the world keeps on working harder. :dunno:
 

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apar330i said:
I find the attitudes of parents that think math and science aren't that important quite disturbing. I hope these attitudes aren't carried over into our school systems. Granted, many of us don't use a lot of math and science but I think they need to be taught to help develop a child's analytical abilities. If I had to do it all over again I would have paid a lot more attention in both of these areas.

This is the most important thing! Math and science do teach problem solving and reasoning. It might be the #1 reason that most large corporations are looking for CEO's with and MBA and a BS in some field of Engineering or other higher technical field...even if the company has nothing to do with technology or science.
 

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Test_Engineer said:
This is the most important thing! Math and science do teach problem solving and reasoning. It might be the #1 reason that most large corporations are looking for CEO's with and MBA and a BS in some field of Engineering or other higher technical field...even if the company has nothing to do with technology or science.
Right ON!!

who? I hold a degree in Materials Engr.
 

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01silber said:
well its easier in some countries
math question taken from any crazy country :
If billy straps 2.5kilos of C4 around his belly and triggers it right after lunch in a busy city street; How many people will he kill?
Actually, I like this response the best :rofl:

But hey, what exactly IS important in the center of Maine in nowheresville? I have no idea.

But I agree, math and science are important to teach to the youngins.
 

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Test_Engineer said:
This is the most important thing! Math and science do teach problem solving and reasoning. It might be the #1 reason that most large corporations are looking for CEO's with and MBA and a BS in some field of Engineering or other higher technical field...even if the company has nothing to do with technology or science.

What? What company is this? Inquiring minds need to know!
 
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