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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,
I got Continental ContactProContact SSR(225/45/18 91v)
I just got 50000 kms(31000 miles) on it and tread is close to 3.
My dealer is its bare minimum and I won't drive with these tires in winter. I am from Toronto.

I want to know if is it safe to replace OEM Run flats with non non flats.
I have below Three tires in mind and if you have any good suggestions please let me know.

Happy holidays.

Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus Tire
Michelin CrossClimate® Tire
Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 Tire

Car Model- 2017 330i xDrive
 

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But, in the US Michelin PS2's are an obsolescent tire, replaced by the Pilot Super Sports (PSS's) which were then replaced by the Pilot Sport 4S's (PS 4S's). They're also a summer, high performance tire. In addition to not being drivable in snow, summer high performance tires are susceptible to damage if under load at temperatures below 20F (-7C). So, unless you have a heated garage I'd stay away from the PS 4S's. The PS AS 3+ is an all-season high performance tire, probably a good compromise for where you live.

With non-RFT's, you'll need a spare and US/Canadian F3X's didn't come with one. Bimmerzone.com sells a steel-wheel spare tire kit. But, they're usually jury rigs requiring centering rings (since the hub is smaller than the hole in the wheel). Some countries require spare tires, so BMW did make one for the F3X. Here's a company in the UK that sells OE spares on aluminum rims. They're a lot lighter than the steel wheel spares. They're about $500 USD with shipping. You'll need to buy a jack, too.

https://www.alloywheelsdirect.net/option/bmw_spare_wheel_kits
 

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Pirelli p7 all season plus

I had Pirelli P7 run flats and switched to Pirelli P7 All season plus non run flats. The new tire absorbs road imperfections much better and in general is a more comfortable tire in all driving conditions. Significantly better ride on the highway. The more comfortable ride is a big deal for me. However, they dont handle quite as well on the off ramps and general cornering. Also I live in Chicago and they are not quite as good in the snow as the runflats I had. Overall Im happy with the new tire but it depends on whats important to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
But, in the US Michelin PS2's are an obsolescent tire, replaced by the Pilot Super Sports (PSS's) which were then replaced by the Pilot Sport 4S's (PS 4S's). They're also a summer, high performance tire. In addition to not being drivable in snow, summer high performance tires are susceptible to damage if under load at temperatures below 20F (-7C). So, unless you have a heated garage I'd stay away from the PS 4S's. The PS AS 3+ is an all-season high performance tire, probably a good compromise for where you live.

With non-RFT's, you'll need a spare and US/Canadian F3X's didn't come with one. Bimmerzone.com sells a steel-wheel spare tire kit. But, they're usually jury rigs requiring centering rings (since the hub is smaller than the hole in the wheel). Some countries require spare tires, so BMW did make one for the F3X. Here's a company in the UK that sells OE spares on aluminum rims. They're a lot lighter than the steel wheel spares. They're about $500 USD with shipping. You'll need to buy a jack, too.

https://www.alloywheelsdirect.net/option/bmw_spare_wheel_kits

Thanks for your reply. Most probably I will be going with Michelin PILOT SPORT A/S 3+ . Saw some good reviews on Tirerack.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I had Pirelli P7 run flats and switched to Pirelli P7 All season plus non run flats. The new tire absorbs road imperfections much better and in general is a more comfortable tire in all driving conditions. Significantly better ride on the highway. The more comfortable ride is a big deal for me. However, they dont handle quite as well on the off ramps and general cornering. Also I live in Chicago and they are not quite as good in the snow as the runflats I had. Overall Im happy with the new tire but it depends on whats important to you.
Thanks for the reply. In Canada we have 4-5 months of snow and cold. So probably comfort and winter driving is important for me. I was considering Michelin Cross Climate but few dealers said that they are good in winter but soft in summer and feel like dragging.
 

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Do You Smell That?
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Thanks for your reply. Most probably I will be going with Michelin PILOT SPORT A/S 3+ . Saw some good reviews on Tirerack.


I had these on my 335 and loved them. I do,however, live in NorCal and never see snow and rarely freezing temps.


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just copacetic!!!
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Our 428 GC has Driveguards and they are much better wear-wise than the original OEMs which lasted only about 10k miles(can’t recall that brand). The Driveguards have almost 20k miles and thread is at 6/32. I expect to get at least another 10-15k miles; we live on a winding road that tends to scrub the tires faster.
 

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But, in the US Michelin PS2's are an obsolescent tire, replaced by the Pilot Super Sports (PSS's) which were then replaced by the Pilot Sport 4S's (PS 4S's). They're also a summer, high performance tire. In addition to not being drivable in snow, summer high performance tires are susceptible to damage if under load at temperatures below 20F (-7C). So, unless you have a heated garage I'd stay away from the PS 4S's. The PS AS 3+ is an all-season high performance tire, probably a good compromise for where you live.

With non-RFT's, you'll need a spare and US/Canadian F3X's didn't come with one. Bimmerzone.com sells a steel-wheel spare tire kit. But, they're usually jury rigs requiring centering rings (since the hub is smaller than the hole in the wheel). Some countries require spare tires, so BMW did make one for the F3X. Here's a company in the UK that sells OE spares on aluminum rims. They're a lot lighter than the steel wheel spares. They're about $500 USD with shipping. You'll need to buy a jack, too.

https://www.alloywheelsdirect.net/option/bmw_spare_wheel_kits
technially PS4S have not replaced PSS and PSS are not yet obsolete, although I would say why would you buy PSS when you can buy PS4S.

You don't need a spare. You can just get a mobility kit, rely on your own roadside assistance, or Michelin includes 3yrs free roadside assistance which includes free towing up to 150 miles for 2018 and newer replacement tires under its new Michelin Promise Plan.
 

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Hello All,
I got Continental ContactProContact SSR(225/45/18 91v)
I just got 50000 kms(31000 miles) on it and tread is close to 3.
My dealer is its bare minimum and I won't drive with these tires in winter. I am from Toronto.

I want to know if is it safe to replace OEM Run flats with non non flats.
I have below Three tires in mind and if you have any good suggestions please let me know.

Happy holidays.

Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus Tire
Michelin CrossClimate® Tire
Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 Tire

Car Model- 2017 330i xDrive
Yes, it is safe to replace RFT with non-RFT. The only "safety" factor you need to account for is mobility in case of a flat with non-RFT. that is where having roadside assistance plan, spare w/jack and tools, mobility kit, etc comes into play. Even with RFT, you may have to rely on roadside assistance, as RFT don't mean you can roll on them for long distance (e.g. greater than 50miles). Even with a spare donut, you shouldn't roll on them for long distance either, even though there are idiots who drive on them like they are a full size standard wheel.

I'm a Michelin man, so I'd go with the A/S 3+, especially since Michelin will pay for towing up to 150 miles under their Michelin Promise Plan.
 

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technially PS4S have not replaced PSS and PSS are not yet obsolete, although I would say why would you buy PSS when you can buy PS4S.

You don't need a spare. You can just get a mobility kit, rely on your own roadside assistance, or Michelin includes 3yrs free roadside assistance which includes free towing up to 150 miles for 2018 and newer replacement tires under its new Michelin Promise Plan.
Yeah, I do.

I had a BMW Mobility System in my first BMW. I never pulled it out of it's hole under the trunk in the twelve years I had the car. I bought a spare tire instead. I eventually had one rapid deflation with that car. But, when it happened I put on the spare and I was back on my way in less that 30 minutes.... on a Saturday night.

Although I've only had that one rapid deflation in my 1,000,000+ miles of driving, I've had a lot of punctures that resulted in a slow leak. When that happens, I put the spare on in the comfort of my garage, and take the punctured tire in for repair with my other car. That keeps the another potential idiot from ever touching my BMW.

A spare tires is also necessary for DIY tire rotations.

Tow truck drivers are often idiots, and sometimes psychopaths. The fewer of them I have to deal with, the better. Besides, only a girly man would stand there and watch a manly man change his tire for him.

The dirty little secret is that you also need a spare tire with run-flats. Here's my favorite BF thread on that: the sad tale of the once proud F25 X3 owner and his $1400 flat tire.

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=917185


They're currently dealing on M2C's. But, there's no spare tire available that fits it. So, no M2C for me. My next fancy car could very well be my last, since I'm old and I keep cars a long time. A Porsche 911's on my bucket list, but the new 992 doesn't seem to offer a spare either. So, it's starting to look like my next fancy car will be a not-so-fancy 330i., with OE non-run-flats and an OE spare tire.
 

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There are a lot of scenarios where those (im)mobility systems don't work: big puncture in the tread, puncture in the sidewall, bent or cracked rim not holding air, tire delamination, etc., etc., etc. I'd feel pretty damn stupid sitting on the side of the road out in the middle of nowhere in a $50k or $75k BMW, or a $120k Porsche, and thinking "****, if I'd driven my $3k Chevy Cobalt, I'd still be on my way to where I was going."
 

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OP, there is nothing "wrong" with 30,000 miles on a RFT. That is pretty average. Summer performance tires will likely have a lower tread life, due to their softer compound.

intjm I will side with Putzer on this one. While I carry compressor kits in all my cars (I have the Lexus Kit which appears to be identical to the BMW kit at half the cost, and comparable to the Conti kit) it's not always gonna work. Example: On the very second day I had my X535D I picked up a 6" hunk of rebar in one f the 20" rears. (Dunlop summer performance tires; made the barge handle pretty well, but I was lucky to get 10,000 miles out of them. Luckily, they were also screw-and-nail magnets, and 3 of the 4 tires got replaced under my road hazard warranty. Thank God, because the rears were over $650 each).

But I digress. That rebar opened a gaping hole in the tire, and even God's Own Fix-a-Flat would have been unable to patch it. They were RFT's so I limped home, and had the dealer pick it up with a flat bed the next day. If I had no spare, and only a compressor and can of Slime, I would have been SOL.

Another disadvantage to the Slime (though not to the compressor per se) is it makes a Godawful mess inside the tire, likely requiring TPMS replacement. Definitely not a panacea.
 

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Just adding a thought for run flats. I have had Bridgestone Dueler RFTs on my X5 with 169,000 miles since it came from the factory. In the past 4 years I have had 8 punctures. Having run flats allowed me to survive the drive home of many miles with huge punctures. I was just about to switch to non-run flats but I’m keeping the Bridgestones. Rides harder yes but less worries for me. There are so many used RFTs available I can always match tread if I lose one.


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Yeah, I do.

I had a BMW Mobility System in my first BMW. I never pulled it out of it's hole under the trunk in the twelve years I had the car. I bought a spare tire instead. I eventually had one rapid deflation with that car. But, when it happened I put on the spare and I was back on my way in less that 30 minutes.... on a Saturday night.

Although I've only had that one rapid deflation in my 1,000,000+ miles of driving, I've had a lot of punctures that resulted in a slow leak. When that happens, I put the spare on in the comfort of my garage, and take the punctured tire in for repair with my other car. That keeps the another potential idiot from ever touching my BMW.

A spare tires is also necessary for DIY tire rotations.

Tow truck drivers are often idiots, and sometimes psychopaths. The fewer of them I have to deal with, the better. Besides, only a girly man would stand there and watch a manly man change his tire for him.

The dirty little secret is that you also need a spare tire with run-flats. Here's my favorite BF thread on that: the sad tale of the once proud F25 X3 owner and his $1400 flat tire.

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=917185


They're currently dealing on M2C's. But, there's no spare tire available that fits it. So, no M2C for me. My next fancy car could very well be my last, since I'm old and I keep cars a long time. A Porsche 911's on my bucket list, but the new 992 doesn't seem to offer a spare either. So, it's starting to look like my next fancy car will be a not-so-fancy 330i., with OE non-run-flats and an OE spare tire.
the whole intent is to get something fixed or replaced. the mobility kit is and has always been a temp solution, and chances are you will need a tow of some sort. a spare has limitations like when I along with a whole line of cars flatted two or more tires on the same pothole. Don't know why you would need a spare for DIY tire rotations, since I have rotated without needing a spare. runflats just like donuts are temp solutions. i'll save my rant for the rant you linked to...chiefly it wasn't a $1400 flat tire, and secondly the laughability of saying you didn't know you didn't have a spare or jack equipment until you got a flat. anyway, do what works for you, but just because you have one spare doesn't guarantee you anything. case in point, my experience.
 

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There are a lot of scenarios where those (im)mobility systems don't work: big puncture in the tread, puncture in the sidewall, bent or cracked rim not holding air, tire delamination, etc., etc., etc. I'd feel pretty damn stupid sitting on the side of the road out in the middle of nowhere in a $50k or $75k BMW, or a $120k Porsche, and thinking "****, if I'd driven my $3k Chevy Cobalt, I'd still be on my way to where I was going."
yes, there are also lots of scenarios where a spare, runflats, or otherwise won't work either. Fact is, you should always have a backup solution and know the limitations of what you have or don't have.

your relative cost scenario of cars is meaningless. you could easily be sitting on the side of the road in a $3k chevy cobalt. Is this some sort of pride thing folks have? It's the most absurd argument. I own a $200k car, does that somehow prevent being left stranded if a deer hits me? And no, you would not be on your way going to where you were going if you had those tire or rim issues in your $3k cobalt, unless your cobalt is somehow immune to such scenarios.
 

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OP, there is nothing "wrong" with 30,000 miles on a RFT. That is pretty average. Summer performance tires will likely have a lower tread life, due to their softer compound.

intjm I will side with Putzer on this one. While I carry compressor kits in all my cars (I have the Lexus Kit which appears to be identical to the BMW kit at half the cost, and comparable to the Conti kit) it's not always gonna work. Example: On the very second day I had my X535D I picked up a 6" hunk of rebar in one f the 20" rears. (Dunlop summer performance tires; made the barge handle pretty well, but I was lucky to get 10,000 miles out of them. Luckily, they were also screw-and-nail magnets, and 3 of the 4 tires got replaced under my road hazard warranty. Thank God, because the rears were over $650 each).

But I digress. That rebar opened a gaping hole in the tire, and even God's Own Fix-a-Flat would have been unable to patch it. They were RFT's so I limped home, and had the dealer pick it up with a flat bed the next day. If I had no spare, and only a compressor and can of Slime, I would have been SOL.

Another disadvantage to the Slime (though not to the compressor per se) is it makes a Godawful mess inside the tire, likely requiring TPMS replacement. Definitely not a panacea.
note, I have always written a combination of solutions. note I write mobility kit and roadside assistance. there's a reason for that. Even if you have a spare, that ain't gonna help in different situations. Case in point when I flatted two tires, a spare would have done no good, but sealants were sufficient as a temp fix. You can be a prepper all you want, but unless you are gonna carry enough tires and wheels for every eventuality, which is impractical, you are going to take risks in certain areas and remediate with backup solutions. Yes, sealants create a mess and may do bad things like clog tpms, etc, blah, blah, blah. But that is not the intent. The intent is to provide a temporary solution...triage of sorts. so, we can all go on and on, but the fact is do what you think is a solution and understand that you may need a backup to whatever solution you decide is best for you.
 
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