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My 2017 X3 is equipped with all-season run-flats. I'd really like to buy a winter wheel and tire set, but my dealer stopped storing them for customers a few years ago. I just don't want to deal with the inconvenience of transporting and storing the tires when I change them out every six months.

I searched for places that would store the tires for me, but all I'm finding are tire shops that want to do the work of installing the wheels for you. I'd prefer to have my dealer install everything because I've had bad experiences with third-party shops figuring out things like the TPM system.

Does anyone have any suggestions I haven't thought of?
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 99K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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Diy.
 

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+1

You'd need:

Floor jack
Torque wrench
Breaker bar/Ratchet
Socket
Extension bar
Tire pressure gauge
Air pump
Mechanic's stool

If you have a square set-up, you can use one of the winter tires/wheels as a place holder for doing DIY tire rotations. That will keep all four tires roughly the same diameter and reduce stress (clutch wear) on your xDrive transfer case.

DIY-ing, you can go back and forth between winter and summer tires/wheels when and as often as you want, and not have to wait in line at the dealership or tire store when the weather changes.

Installing and balancing four tires would run you at least $100, and that's twice a year. Tire rotation would run you $25. Having all four tires wear out evenly and maybe save having to buy one more set of tires before you sell the car/truck could save you over $1000.

Also, as you eluded to, DIY-ing keeps the idiots away from your BMW.

A second set of wheels ant TPMS sensors for the winter tires will be very expensive. But, you will gain part of that back by not having to pay for installations each year and tire rotation. Also, you can get something for them when you sell the car.

DIY-ing these simple tasks in your driveway or garage with an open door will also impress your wife and other women in the 'hood with your mechanical genius and manliness in general. You can also do it on a weekend and not miss work. I was paid by the hour and I could work as much or as little as I wanted each weekday. So, time was money, literally, at least Monday through Friday.
 

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A second set of wheels ant TPMS sensors for the winter tires will be very expensive.
If you downsize rims, getting new rims with TPMS can be quite economical thanks to the difference in the cost of rubber, depending on your original tire size (and how fancy of rims you want). I went from 19" down to 17" and ordered from Tire Rack where they put everything together for free (Install TPMS, mount, balance) if you order it all at the same time. They also sell some nice tire totes for about $45/set that will give you a handle with which to carry them and protection of your interior from dirt, etc... if you load them into your car to take them to a shop to be swapped out. I use a wooden furniture cart from Harbor Freight ($8) to stack the tires on so that I can move them around easily without re-stacking them. If you keep the cardboard discs that the rims ship with, you can stuff one in each tire tote to protect the face of the rim in storage.
 

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The issue with smaller rims is that they need to clear the calipers. All season tires are a joke in your area. I definitely concur with the recommendation to go to tirerack. I’d see if there are steel wheels available for your car. Why? Cheeepo alloys bend very easily. I went through a set of alloys (with snow tires) and then I bought a set of BMW steel wheels. The steelies were straight as an arrow when I sold the car with the steelies years later. Yeah, they are ugly but if you’re going to keep the car they are a worthwhile investment.
 

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I've had cheap alloys for my winter tires on my 3 series and both of my X3s. I've never had a problem with the rims bending, even in the great state of Pottholevannia. The 17s clear the calipers easily on my '16 X3
 

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If you downsize rims, getting new rims with TPMS can be quite economical thanks to the difference in the cost of rubber, depending on your original tire size (and how fancy of rims you want). I went from 19" down to 17" and ordered from Tire Rack where they put everything together for free (Install TPMS, mount, balance) if you order it all at the same time. They also sell some nice tire totes for about $45/set that will give you a handle with which to carry them and protection of your interior from dirt, etc... if you load them into your car to take them to a shop to be swapped out. I use a wooden furniture cart from Harbor Freight ($8) to stack the tires on so that I can move them around easily without re-stacking them. If you keep the cardboard discs that the rims ship with, you can stuff one in each tire tote to protect the face of the rim in storage.
OE genuine BMW 18" rims for the G01 X3 are about $320 on-line. That's about twice what aftermarket rims would be. BMW parts websites say that they'll fit the X3 M40i, too.

We've eventually moving north, and Frau Putzer's X3 and my beater will be our designated snow cars. I'm keeping summer tires on my 535i.
 
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