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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I’ll spare you the details. I over torqued a lug. It just wasn’t clicking and I kept turning it. The head and some thread snapped off. My shop said I should be fine with four until the next time in for service and they will get it out.

Car rides fine. It’s the front drivers wheel. Thoughts? I’m pissed, brand new wheels that I just want to enjoy without worrying.

 

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4 will do you fine, just don’t drive 100MPH and take sharp turns.
 
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If it broke at the threads, as you mentioned, you should be able to just unscrew it out if you take the wheel off first. There's no tension on the lug bolt without the tapered shoulder against the wheel. Remove the wheel, you may need to take a bladed screw driver & tap it at the edge of the broken screw counter clockwise to get it out a little, to where you can grab it with you fingers or pliers to unscrew it the rest of the way. (ask me how I know) See if one of your buddies has a spare M12 lug bolt. I wouldn't do any sporty type driving or hard turns but you should be OK. Torque is 120Nm or 88.5 ft/lbs, (90 ft/lbs is a good round number) and easy to find on torque wrench. Good luck..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both. This is very helpful and puts my mind at ease. I just got the car out of the shop and want to drive it a bit before it goes back in. He said it there were any negative signs, I’d feel a slight wobble as a heads up to get it fixed but he doubted I’d experience this.
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 105K miles NOKIAN WR G3 20K miles
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NOpe. The screws only provide clamping force to the hub that does the centering radial alignment and axial alignment. the lugs are not loaded in shear.
 
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Remove the wheel, the broken stud will be easy to remove.
This is why I no longer use click-type torque wrench, although it is great but once the mechanism (the clicking mechanism) fails, it is just a disaster.
I now use only dial-type torque wrench...
 

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'03 BMW 530i 5 Speed Sport.
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You're good, I've ridden on 4 lugs for years and years when mine got stripped. I was in college, a looooong time ago, didn't effect a thing. Even went above 100mph. 😕
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks again. I fully expected the feedback to be “get that fixed ASAP your wheel is going to fall off”

Truth be told, I had never used a torque wrench before. I got the car back from the shop after being there for a week for window regulators and some center links.

I got these square Style 65’s with new rubber the next day. Called a few shops to do the swap but all were too busy and understaffed. So me and a buddy with a floor jack did it at lunch time. Unfortunately his torque wrench had the wrong socket. So I used the tool in tool kit. My back is feeling that today.

I stopped by the same shop to borrow their torque wrench. He gave me a quick tutorial and cautioned me on not over tighten. I asked him to set it 80.

On went well, seems my hand tightening was fine. Got to the last wheel and one of the lugs just kept turning with no click. I better judgement told me it was plenty right. But I backed it off and tested the wrench on a different lug that already clicked and it clicked again. So nothing wrong with the wrench. I went back at it and it pretty much twisted the lug apart.

I can do a lot well on the E39, but sometimes I just F up the most easy things.
 

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2001 BMW E39 540i Automatic Sedan, 198 K milesmiles
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.....
I can do a lot well on the E39, but sometimes I just F up the most easy things.
That happens or happened to all of us.
On my wheel lugs, I use a breaker bar, and torque the lug good-and-tight. Never had a problem...and no need for the torque wrench.
I measured it once, and found it about 85 ft-pounds, within Bentley specs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That happens or happened to all of us.
On my wheel lugs, I use a breaker bar, and torque the lug good-and-tight. Never had a problem...and no need for the torque wrench.
I measured it once, and found it about 85 ft-pounds, within Bentley specs.
Yup, I should have left well enough alone with my own physical torque with the lug wrench in the trunk. Guess you can how many times in my life I’ve changed a tire. Definitely won’t happen again. I am curious if there is an extractor that can get the screw out without removing the wheel. I have an extractor kit for my drill, but that probably more for household screws. I also will most likely scratch the wheel trying to get it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yup, I should have left well enough alone with my own physical torque with the lug wrench in the trunk. Guess you can how many times in my life I’ve changed a tire. Definitely won’t happen again. I am curious if there is an extractor that can get the screw out without removing the wheel. I have an extractor kit for my drill, but that probably more for household screws. I also will most likely scratch the wheel trying to get it out.
I wish I kept the broken off piece. Probably could have super glued it to the other end and unscrewed.
 

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Maybe...but my hunch and amateur DIY experience advice is to leave the snapped bolt alone. You can drive safely with 4 lugs. As you may do more harm when trying to extract it.
So forget it.
[ That happened to me when I snapped a 10 mm bolt on the engine bloc while replacing the oil pan gasket. ! ] :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Maybe...but my hunch and amateur DIY experience advice is to leave the snapped bolt alone. You can drive safely with 4 lugs. As you may do more harm when trying to extract it.
So forget it.
[ That happened to me when I snapped a 10 mm bolt on the engine bloc while replacing the oil pan gasket. ! ] :mad:
Agreed, just a thought. My intuition says leave well enough alone. My OCD is another story. I am guessing my OCD will lead me back to the shop for them to pop the wheel off and remove and replace sooner rather than later.
 

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Just do what CN90 said. Remove the wheel then remove the remaining stud. An alternative could be to epoxy a smaller diameter hex-head bolt to the remaining bit of lug bolt and just remove it that way. You might be able to do that without removing the wheel.
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 105K miles NOKIAN WR G3 20K miles
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The failure of an unnecessarily complicated tool should be a cautionary lesson.

Even simpler than the falsely accurate dial indicator torque wrench is the simple bending beam with pointer. That’s what I was required to use in my career, and to calibrate it with a metrology standard to the required indication and direction.

somewhere in the 2,000 pages of my Machinery’s Handbook 19th Edition is the statement that an experienced machinist can accurately estimate torque applied up to some significant fastener diameter, perhaps a half-inch.
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 105K miles NOKIAN WR G3 20K miles
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Just do what CN90 said. Remove the wheel then remove the remaining stud. An alternative could be to epoxy a smaller diameter hex-head bolt to the remaining bit of lug bolt and just remove it that way. You might be able to do that without removing the wheel.
I would finally use a left handed drill bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just do what CN90 said. Remove the wheel then remove the remaining stud. An alternative could be to epoxy a smaller diameter hex-head bolt to the remaining bit of lug bolt and just remove it that way. You might be able to do that without removing the wheel.
Thanks. I am tempted to go in again, but I fear I over torqued the remaining 4 bolts and getting off will be a bitch with the trunk tool and I may even break another which would now be a disaster with no bolts on hand. I pleaded with my indie right up the street to take 15 minutes out of his day to pop off, remove and replace. He is too busy today. The epoxy thing might work. Good idea. Something like reversing a drywall screw with some glue on the tip. Just need some epoxy, I bet superglue will not work. Can't hurt and I don't think I could really do any damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
^^^ Where did you find the new wheels ( style 65)
Facebook, the are newly refinished replicas. They came with brand new Michelin A/S +3 rubber. The purchase was more about the rubber, but they look good for $500 bucks for the winter. Wheel finish is nice and new,
Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Vehicle Car
 
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