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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that June/July is the typical SOP for X5's etc. Haven't read that that timing has shifted and I'm seriously considering moving from my G30 / 2017 540xDrive to the X5 xDrive 45e.

However, one factor that is slowing that decision is the abysmally slow charging times because of the limits of on-board charger. I've searched for but have not found ANY updates or news that that there are any changes to be made for 2022. Sure it's a PHEV, but the prospect of needing to plug in for several hours to take advantage of driving on battery is keeping me from the level of excitement necessary to replace my very low mileage (and pretty economical: 27+mpg over 30,000 miles) '17 G30.

Anyone have any news to share or help modify my thoughts?
 

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I'm in the same boat - waiting to buy because 1) possibility of a better charger for MY2022, 2) the new car market seems to be tightening, 3) new EVs that I am considering as an alternative are still priced at MSRP, 4) the Federal EV tax credit isn't as straightforward as it appears so waiting until later in the tax year will clarify the impact of the EV credit.
 

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I know that June/July is the typical SOP for X5's etc. Haven't read that that timing has shifted and I'm seriously considering moving from my G30 / 2017 540xDrive to the X5 xDrive 45e.
I was told by my advisor that ordering guides for MY 2022 are expected August/September. So I seriously doubt SOP June/July especially considering shortage of parts. More like Oct/Nov.
 

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I don’t know if the 22 X5s will allow faster charging rates but BMW is requiring dealers start updating from the 40amp 240v ( 208 in commercial setting ) to no less than 80amp chargers soon and re-vamping the criteria for dealerships equipment needed to be i certified.
 

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I read of many people bemoaning the slow charging time, however it doesn’t bother me in the least. I do have the benefit of charging both at work and at home and I very, very rarely make multiple 30-50 mile trips in a single day. My electric driving % is currently at 82% only because I’m still diluting the 65 mile ice trip home from the dealership into my total miles driven. Once I’ve had the car a few more months, I should be at or over 90% electric miles. I do occasionally put the car in sport mode for short trips on Sundays, well, because it is a BMW...:) I expect to have to fill up the fuel tank four or maybe five times a year. If you think a PHEV is not the right car for you, perhaps an EV is more suited to your driving habits. EV charging infrastructure here (nw PA) is dreadfully lacking, which is why I went PHEV and it happens to suit my driving habits perfectly.

Regarding the PHEV federal income tax credit, it would be a very rare tax situation that would preclude owners of the 45e from utilizing the entire tax credit, both income wise and tax liability wise. It’s possible, but very unlikely unless you have a very complicated return and utilize multiple tax credits on your return. I don’t recall exactly, having done my taxes in March, what my federal tax liability was exactly, but I think it was in the lower $30K range; four times + the necessary liability. No one making less than $80K-$100K/year minimum or is independently wealthy should be considering a 45e anyway imho, but I’m financially conservative also... Its scary to me the debt load some people carry today, especially the ‘younger’ <40 crowd.
 

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Regarding the PHEV federal income tax credit, it would be a very rare tax situation that would preclude owners of the 45e from utilizing the entire tax credit, both income wise and tax liability wise. It’s possible, but very unlikely unless you have a very complicated return and utilize multiple tax credits on your return.
It's not the EV credit that's complicated, but its effect on other credits that are limited like the R&D credit. So while you may be able to use the entire EV credit, it could displace some of your other credits leaving a net effect of less than $7,500 and either a loss of other credits or a carryforward of unused credits to future tax years. At least, that's what my accountant tells me. But my tax return is almost 100 pages long (small business owner), so admittedly these situations are probably rare.

If the current administration is able to convert today's EV tax credit to a point of sale credit, or if BMW would reduce the capitalized cost of a 45e lease by the full amount of the EV credit then I would be in the market for a new vehicle today.
 

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I’m a small business owner as well; co-owner in both a privately held C-corp and S-Corp. I am also a degreed accountant with a masters in business administration. My current (for many years now) title is VP Finance. Like I said, it’s possible, just not likely to be a common occurrence among 45e owners. Good luck to you! Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don’t know if the 22 X5s will allow faster charging rates but BMW is requiring dealers start updating from the 40amp 240v ( 208 in commercial setting ) to no less than 80amp chargers soon and re-vamping the criteria for dealerships equipment needed to be i certified.
Probably in readiness for i4 & iX.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was told by my advisor that ordering guides for MY 2022 are expected August/September. So I seriously doubt SOP June/July especially considering shortage of parts. More like Oct/Nov.
Not surprising esp given the parts shortages and new /used automobile inventory circumstances now and in the future as the impact of Covid-19 changes and there is increased driving for work & pleasure.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I read of many people bemoaning the slow charging time, however it doesn’t bother me in the least. ... If you think a PHEV is not the right car for you, perhaps an EV is more suited to your driving habits. EV charging infrastructure here (nw PA) is dreadfully lacking, which is why I went PHEV and it happens to suit my driving habits perfectly.
I'm considering EVs as well. The Tesla models [esp Y & S] are interesting and seem to be the most "evolved" of the bunch. But having bought and driven BMWs since 1986 x-shopping is almost like cheating on a spouse ;-) LOL

PS thanks for the commentary on taxes - it surely applies to many who live and buy/lease beyond their means. Doesn't apply to me but it's the same advice I give to others whose wants exceed their means ;-)
 
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MY2022 is not a LCI refresh year for the X5 45e. Given the COVID-related component shortages and the fact that there not dearth of consumer interest in the 45e, I highly doubt there’d be any significant changes. An update on charging components for faster speed may not even come with LCI (MY2023/24?) unless an equivalent competitor does the same thing first. Their goal is to ensure the batteries reliably last the full warranted 8 yrs (or 10 in California), and slow charging helps with that given the small battery capacity will cause it to go through more full charge cycles in its life.
 

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I know that June/July is the typical SOP for X5's etc. Haven't read that that timing has shifted and I'm seriously considering moving from my G30 / 2017 540xDrive to the X5 xDrive 45e.
That is not correct, typically the MY starts production in August.
 

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I was told by my advisor that ordering guides for MY 2022 are expected August/September. So I seriously doubt SOP June/July especially considering shortage of parts. More like Oct/Nov.
I would question that, some ordering guides have been released already and unless something drastically has changed, the rest should be out within the next few weeks.
 

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MY2022 is not a LCI refresh year for the X5 45e. LCI (MY2023/24?)
2023 would make it 4 years since MY 2019 introduction. Which is possible, considering COVID delays. But 2024 is 5 years out of typical 7 years cycle - sounds unlikely.
 

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2023 would make it 4 years since MY 2019 introduction. Which is possible, considering COVID delays. But 2024 is 5 years out of typical 7 years cycle - sounds unlikely.
The LCI is currently scheduled to begin 4/23 with an early MY24 introduction and EOP of 7/26.
 

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There are also different opinions


X3 which launched one year earlier has LCI this year. I personally rather belive that G05 LCI will launch next year as MY23.
 

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There are also different opinions


X3 which launched one year earlier has LCI this year. I personally rather belive that G05 LCI will launch next year as MY23.

A couple of months ago that had the LCI in MY22 using old test mule pictures. That is a site to be ignored 9/10 times.

 

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My gripe with the X5 45e is there's no spare tire available. In contrast, the 540i is now a mild-hybrid (as opposed to a spicy hybrid) with fuel economy within one or two MPG of a 530i, and it still offers a spare tire as an option.
 

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My gripe with the X5 45e is there's no spare tire available. In contrast, the 540i is now a mild-hybrid (as opposed to a spicy hybrid) with fuel economy within one or two MPG of a 530i, and it still offers a spare tire as an option.
I agree with you but practically knowing everything that is stuffed into that body, where would you make space for a spare tire? Also, people buying 45es purely fuel economy reasons are probably buying the wrong car for their needs. I bought it for instant torque (and general combined power output), exceptionally good in cabin noise isolation that is complemented by the electric power train for pin drop silence (almost). That it is not a gas guzzler did factor in but it was far from the primary consideration.

It is a bit ironic though that my 435iGC has more trunk space (length, width and height) when only considering the space below the seat backs and below any glass. The X5 45e wins when you load up to the roof and risk unsecured items knocking on the rear windshield, but the other aspect was interesting.
 

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The spare tire space is made by raising the trunk floor about seven inches. For a 5 Series, there's still sufficient space left. For a 3 Series and a spare tires, it ends up being 14.5" of trunk height. That's enough for a 34-quart Rubbermaid or Thermos ice chest (13.75" high).
20210112 bmw g20 trunk with spare tire #3.jpg



I had a 330e loaner, which presumably has the same raised trunk floor (but no spare), and my ice chest fit.

20210316 bmw 330e (G20) trunk & 34 quart ice chest.jpg


Actually big, heavy vehicles are the ones that benefit most from heroic measures to improve fuel economy. MPG is a bad metric. Fuel consumption (GPM or gallons/100 miles) is more relevant. If you drive 10k miles/year, going from 20 MPG to 30 MPG would save you 167 gallons/year. But, going from 30 MPG to 40 MPG would only save you 83 MPG.

gallons per 10k mles vs mpg.jpg


VW made and sold 200 hundred diesel, hybrids that got 250 MPG. They weighed 1750 pounds, with the body being made of magnesium and carbon fiber. The reality is that they accomplished very little.

vw xl1.jpg
 
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