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ROLL TIDE!
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Nope, but you can probably just use clear super glue
 

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Coconut Pete's paella!
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Discussion Starter #3
Ehh.... I think i'll have to pass on the super glue idea. I know it exists, i've seen it I just can't remember for the life of me what it's called.
 

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Coconut Pete's paella!
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Discussion Starter #5
There's a specific product that's the same glue..... that's what I'm looking for.
 

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Supporter of Bimmer Lore
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Yeah, I read somewhere about that specific kind of industrial thermally-activated glue. I think it is urethane or polyurethane based.

Given that super glue or silicone sealer would probable be a one-shot deal, barring further bakings, how about using hot-melt glue or sealant? For example, just saw this in Sears online. At least these would be re-bakeable.
 

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In my own cars again
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There may be some super-duper Bavarian part with an accent like Ahhhnold, but the Tundra folks bake their headlights apart to blackout the innards, and then bake it again to get the adhesive sticky before re-assembly. Many add some RTV to any low or scratched spots on the edges to ensure a good seal. Gasket RTV is good enough for valve covers, should be fine on the headlights, though it's not something that can be baked and re-baked to get it sticky.
 

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In my own cars again
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Jake. What did you post? whatever it is, it's blocked at work.
It's a make-your-own-glue tutorial. Very funny. Also works for hair care products.
 

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Coconut Pete's paella!
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Discussion Starter #12
You'all have great jokes this Friday afternoon don't you:bigpimp:

At least you are keeping me entertained..... until I find my glue!
 

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There's a specific product that's the same glue..... that's what I'm looking for.
Can't swear what BMW's OEM supplier used, but a lot of manufacturers use hot melt butyl adhesive/sealants on headlamp assemblies. They typically do not flow appreciably until at least 105°C. In initial assembly it is usually applied with commercial guns that have a tip temp of around 190°C to 205°C. A number of manufacturers also make essentially the same thing in a "tape" format that can be physically placed and subsequently melted, but it has to be at an interface where the ribbon can be adequately positioned in advance.
 
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