Bimmerfest BMW banner

5641 - 5660 of 8444 Posts

·
BMWCCA HPDE Instructor
Joined
·
23,448 Posts
The BMW doesn't need more than 400hp doe, just 399.99!

Cool stuff though I'm excited for your GTO, does this thing have a rare VIN number too?
My GTO was built as a fairly low-spec model when new. About the only thing it has going for it is that it's a "post coupe", meaning that it has a B-pillar, which allows it to be both stiffer and lighter than the hardtops without the B-pillar. Only about 10% of '66 GTOs were ordered with the B-pillar, so it's a little rare in that sense. Gives it a slightly more hardcore race car vibe, I suppose.

Otherwise, it was also equipped with A/C, which back in those days was quite rare and expensive. It doesn't currently have a compressor hooked up, and I have no desire to put it in, however. So, while the A/C option is rare, it's not particularly cool (pun intended?). It's funny, though - I can't tell you how many times other GTO guys have asked to buy the A/C equipment which is connected to my firewall. Most GTOs which had A/C when new had all that stuff ripped out after they became old beater race cars that nobody cared about. But when GTO values began rising, people wanted to restore their GTOs back to stock form, and the A/C equipment is very hard to find. You'd think I have gold plated hardware under my hood.

But in many ways, given that my GTO was never very special to begin with, and that virtually none of the original drivetrain remains, it is quite liberating. I can make it pretty much whatever car I want it to be without feeling guilty. But I will keep it relatively true to form from a visual perspective. I'm excited for the road ahead! Going to my first GTO Association of America club meeting tonight.

Saw this earlier...didn't know drum brakes were still allowed on new cars. This Duster was a favourite of May near the end of the TG series..
I'm right with you on this one. It boggles my mind. I don't get how drum brake assemblies could ever be less expensive to manufacture and install at the factory than disc brake assemblies. While rear disc brakes have become the norm on pretty much all new cars, there are definitely a handful of automakers who install rear drums - in 2016!!
 

·
Insane in the membrane!
Joined
·
4,561 Posts
Ya, after having worked on drums, I've never understood how it is economical to build drum brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,706 Posts
I'm right with you on this one. It boggles my mind. I don't get how drum brake assemblies could ever be less expensive to manufacture and install at the factory than disc brake assemblies. While rear disc brakes have become the norm on pretty much all new cars, there are definitely a handful of automakers who install rear drums - in 2016!!
Ya, after having worked on drums, I've never understood how it is economical to build drum brakes.
Brake cylinders for drum brakes are far less expensive to make than calipers for disc brakes, and even with your rear disc brakes on your E36 you still have a small set of drum brakes for the e-brake. The drum brakes as primary brakes have fewer and less expensive parts because they can be the main brake and the e-brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,381 Posts
karl, pontiac motors are quite stout, even the "lesser" castings. i used to have a bunch of books regarding performance parts and casting numbers, specs, and such. quite interesting. also where i learned about butler performance and even bought a doug nash intake. never wound up using it....:(


gobs of torque from the ponchos, and at real low rpm. :thumbup:

pictures of progress of said build would be quite appreciated. :D





df
 

·
BMWCCA HPDE Instructor
Joined
·
23,448 Posts
Yeah, I've got a few books on Pontiac V8 engine building, and both mention to avoid using blocks with the 50057 casting number produced between 1975-78 for performance applications. This is the running engine that is currently in my car. To cope with the oil crisis, Pontiac needed to shed vehicle weight, so they redesigned the 400ci block in '75 with reduced main saddles and thinner cylinder walls. For that reason, 400hp is the limit for those blocks which I hear cited most often. So that's why I'm not going to reuse the existing engine. I would've torn it down to nothing to bore & stroke it anyway, so given how cheap the untouched 1968 donor block I recently bought was, it definitely makes the most sense to not reuse the 50057 block. Maybe I'll be able to sell it to someone whole, but it won't fetch much - maybe $500 or so for the longblock.

I'll be sure to document the restoration progress. Had a good time at a GTOAA meeting last night. Met some nice folks and started networking. I also spent a few hours this morning working on my projected budget, and things are looking good. I should have all the money saved and be able to green-light the restoration in late summer/early fall of 2018, then the restoration process will take about a year. Seems like a ways away, but it's nearly 2017 already, and time moves quickly.

Then I'll have to learn how to drag race! :)
 

·
Needs Boost
Joined
·
12,109 Posts
Yeah, I've got a few books on Pontiac V8 engine building, and both mention to avoid using blocks with the 50057 casting number produced between 1975-78 for performance applications. This is the running engine that is currently in my car. To cope with the oil crisis, Pontiac needed to shed vehicle weight, so they redesigned the 400ci block in '75 with reduced main saddles and thinner cylinder walls. For that reason, 400hp is the limit for those blocks which I hear cited most often. So that's why I'm not going to reuse the existing engine. I would've torn it down to nothing to bore & stroke it anyway, so given how cheap the untouched 1968 donor block I recently bought was, it definitely makes the most sense to not reuse the 50057 block. Maybe I'll be able to sell it to someone whole, but it won't fetch much - maybe $500 or so for the longblock.

I'll be sure to document the restoration progress. Had a good time at a GTOAA meeting last night. Met some nice folks and started networking. I also spent a few hours this morning working on my projected budget, and things are looking good. I should have all the money saved and be able to green-light the restoration in late summer/early fall of 2018, then the restoration process will take about a year. Seems like a ways away, but it's nearly 2017 already, and time moves quickly.

Then I'll have to learn how to drag race! :)
Do you have the original block for the car or no?
 

·
BMWCCA HPDE Instructor
Joined
·
23,448 Posts
Do you have the original block for the car or no?
No, it had a built 1970 400ci when I bought it. I cracked a piston in that engine when I was in high school, but it didn't damage the block so I disassembled and stored that block while swapping in a different 400ci which I bought from Autozone. That's the 1975 50057 400ci which is currently in the car. The 1970 400ci block was later used a few years back to build a stroker 462ci, which has been sitting unused and will now be going to my brother's GTO. We do also currently have a spare 455ci block, but they're actually less desirable for making big power with because they have a larger main journal diameter, which means more wear due to faster rotational speed and less robust due to less material present.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
Here is the conclusion to my Miata clutch I posted about a little while ago. The parts came on Saturday like expected. I managed to get everything installed Saturday night and I had to bleed the clutch before everything should have be done. I would have done it that night, but I was the only one awake. On Sunday I bleed the clutch and that should have been the end of the story. However the clutch still would not fully disengage. I spent the rest of Sunday fiddling with the clutch pedal trying to get enough travel in on the slave push rod to disengage the clutch. The best I could get it was just barely engaged with my foot on the floor. With the rear tires in the air and the car in 1st , the tires would spin at about half speed. That was with the clutch pedal adjusted to a ridiculous position. It was nearly hitting the top of the foot well and the pedal rod was on its last threads. With clutch pedal adjusted to a reasonable position the clutch was always fully engaged.

By Wednesday I had completely run out of idea with the hydraulics and comparing the travel on my slave to what I found, it seemed to be pushing enough. So I dropped the tranny expecting to find something I messed up on the clutch. However to my disappointment, the clutch was installed correctly. The clutch disk was facing the right way, the fork did not look bent, the throw out bearing was fine, there was no play in the flywheel and wear on the clutch looked even. The only thing that was slightly sketchy was the pressure plate. The tolerances on it were a little loose as I had to give it a few love taps with a hammer to get in on the flywheel. The pressure plate/clutch kit and flywheel I got was from FX Racing (Ebay). My gut was telling that the pressure plate was defective, so I looked at my local dealer to see if I could get a new OEM one. They wanted more for just the pressure plate than a new OEM clutch kit online, so I went with the internet option.

The new parts came last Monday and on Wednesday night I slammed everything back together. As soon as I put the new pressure plate on I noticed a big difference between the OEM and FX pressure plate. The fingers on the OEM pressure plate sat much closer to the engine than the FX one. It looks like the OEM one requires much less travel to disengage the clutch than the FX one. Also just the general quality of the parts in the OEM kit was much nicer in the OEM kit vs the FX kit. After I had everything together, I tested the clutch and it worked beautifully. It actuality worked so well that I had to readjust the clutch pedal because it was disengaging so high up. Anyway turns out my gut was right and the FX pressure plate was junk. I remember hearing about a few people around here liking the FX kit for there e36 which is why I specifically bought a FX brand clutch kit over one of the other eBay brands. I though it would be good, but it looks like they don’t know how to make a clutch for a Miata or their quality control is just sh!t. I am currently talking to the company to get a refund on the clutch kit. On the bright side the flywheel was fine and my Miata is up and running with a flywheel weighing less than half the stock one.

On a side note, while I was putting my console back together I saw a mouse siting next to me in the passenger side foot well. I spent about 15 trying to grab the little bastard with my hands as it ran all over my Miata. Eventually it vanished under my dash. I then spent the next hour with the lights out and a flash light trying to find it. About an hour after I gave up looking, I saw the mouse run from my trunk to the hood and that is the last time I saw it. I put a mouse trap in the foot well to catch the mouse but I don’t think it is living in my Miata. It is likely a garage mouse. On Friday night I moved the mouse trap from the Miata to the garage and on Saturday morning I woke up to the wonderful sight of a dead mouse that looks just like the one I saw Wednesday night. Later that day I bought 8 mouse traps and put one a every spot the mice come it the garage and one in the foot well. So far that was the only mouse. I think we were only dealing with one mouse.
 

Attachments

5641 - 5660 of 8444 Posts
Top