BimmerFest BMW Forum banner

Tire choice

1229 Views 7 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  Kilgore Trout
I have an 06 330i with sport package. My current tires are oem Michelin pilot run flats which are nearing their wear level. I think they are summer not all seaso tires?

I live in the dc area so we get fairly cold winters but not heaps of snow. This is my only car so I would avoid taking it out in the snow until roads have been ploughed and would take it in slush and of course the colder temperatures.

My question is should I buy a set of dedicated winter tires that can be used nov through march and get one more season out of the current set before I renew to a similar summer performance tire or should I forget two sets and just get a new set of all seasons now and be done with it.

I was thinking that an extra set of tires would kinda break even after a few years by giving the other set a break?

I do enjoy the occasional bit of spirited driving obviously utilizing the summer tires but as my only car I'm concerned they will not give good traction on cold roads and certainly will not get good traction in slush or light snow.... I have 6mt rear heel drive.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
I have the same situation. I own a 335is and replaced the RFTs with Michelin Pilot All Seasons tires. Unless you are a real performance fanatic I doubt that you will even notice the difference between a top rated all season performance tire and a summer performance tire. We don't get enough heavy snow often enough in the DC area to warrant changing to and from winter tires. However, you might consider the Continental Extremes DWS, which are rated significantly higher than other all season tires for wet and light snow conditions.

Anyway, that's my opinion.
I have an 06 330i with sport package. My current tires are oem Michelin pilot run flats which are nearing their wear level. I think they are summer not all seaso tires?

I live in the dc area so we get fairly cold winters but not heaps of snow. This is my only car so I would avoid taking it out in the snow until roads have been ploughed and would take it in slush and of course the colder temperatures.

My question is should I buy a set of dedicated winter tires that can be used nov through march and get one more season out of the current set before I renew to a similar summer performance tire or should I forget two sets and just get a new set of all seasons now and be done with it.

I was thinking that an extra set of tires would kinda break even after a few years by giving the other set a break?

I do enjoy the occasional bit of spirited driving obviously utilizing the summer tires but as my only car I'm concerned they will not give good traction on cold roads and certainly will not get good traction in slush or light snow.... I have 6mt rear heel drive.
Just ordered a set of Conti Extreme DWS. They are being installed this week as soon as the new set of rims arrives. I have had Pirelli P_Zero Nero M&S on the car since I ditced the POS OEM Bridgestone RFTs when the car was a few weeks old. I was going to get Pirellis again but they were not available until October so my choices were Michelin and Continental. I was perfectly happy with the performance of the Pirelli all seasons, probably not as good as a dedicated summer tire but far superior in all respects to the RFTs that came with the car. The Contis are purported to be the next best thing to dedicated winter tires in light snow.

CA
I have the same situation. I own a 335is and replaced the RFTs with Michelin Pilot All Seasons tires. Unless you are a real performance fanatic I doubt that you will even notice the difference between a top rated all season performance tire and a summer performance tire. We don't get enough heavy snow often enough in the DC area to warrant changing to and from winter tires. However, you might consider the Continental Extremes DWS, which are rated significantly higher than other all season tires for wet and light snow conditions.

Anyway, that's my opinion.
I note that DC can average below freezing in Dec - February. Since nearly all summer, high performace tires carry warnings about use in "freezing" temperatures, I would avoid using them in winter months. All-season tires would be the best way to go IMO.
Yep! The temperature limitation was why I didn't stay with summer tires.

Also, after reading about Captain Audio's experience (as well as others) I replaced the RFTs within a week of the car arriving in the US (I took ED delivery). The ride is still a bit too harsh going over rough surfaces but nothing like when I had the RFTs.

Interestingly, I took a vacation last week in Portland Oregon and rented a Volvo convertible (my girlfriend saw it and insisted the "we" - meaning "I" - rent it [$120/day - arrrg]).

At first the car felt rather numb. The steering was uncommunicative and there was no road feel. But it was a comfortable ride.

When I returned home and got back into the 335is I was surprised at how much more effort it took to drive it compared to the Volvo (which was an auto whereas my BMW is a MT6). Hard ride, heavy steering and all that shifting in traffic.

Makes me think that I should have gotten the DCT. And maybe Koni FSDs are worth the investment.

RE the Conti Extremes, two other advantages these tires offer is that Continental includes a road hazard warrantee in the purchase price (worth about $100) and also the tires are nondirectional so they can be rotated left to right.
I note that DC can average below freezing in Dec - February. Since nearly all summer, high performace tires carry warnings about use in "freezing" temperatures, I would avoid using them in winter months. All-season tires would be the best way to go IMO.
RB,

I also went from a Lexus SC300 to a 335 (an i not an is). I had an MT in the SC300 but went for a Steptronic in the 335i because at the time my wife was recovering from an arm injury and was having trouble shifting the MT. I don't miss the MT at all.

Neither of us find the steering in the 335i to be heavy but we both hated the ride quality over poor surfaces even after we replaced the RFTs.
The FSDs made a huge diffenence and are are definitely worth the money and if you decide to get them I would be surprised of you did not agree.

CA
Yep! The temperature limitation was why I didn't stay with summer tires.

Also, after reading about Captain Audio's experience (as well as others) I replaced the RFTs within a week of the car arriving in the US (I took ED delivery). The ride is still a bit too harsh going over rough surfaces but nothing like when I had the RFTs.

Interestingly, I took a vacation last week in Portland Oregon and rented a Volvo convertible (my girlfriend saw it and insisted the "we" - meaning "I" - rent it [$120/day - arrrg]).

At first the car felt rather numb. The steering was uncommunicative and there was no road feel. But it was a comfortable ride.

When I returned home and got back into the 335is I was surprised at how much more effort it took to drive it compared to the Volvo (which was an auto whereas my BMW is a MT6). Hard ride, heavy steering and all that shifting in traffic.

Makes me think that I should have gotten the DCT. And maybe Koni FSDs are worth the investment.

RE the Conti Extremes, two other advantages these tires offer is that Continental includes a road hazard warrantee in the purchase price (worth about $100) and also the tires are nondirectional so they can be rotated left to right.
I'm in the DC area and after running two sets of tires for nearly ten years, have now opted for all-seasons on both my Bimmers. There simply is not enough snow (about 10" average for the entire winter) to justify a second set of wheels/tires but there is enough cold/slushy weather to make summer tires a questionable choice.

Tom
I just switched from Kuhmo summer only tires to the new Bridgestone Potenza 960 all seasons. The ride is a bit improved, but it is a fairly modest shift.

I noticed right off the bat that the car feels less sure footed. So, in my opinion, you do give up dry road performance.

If you look at the wet road stats, the Potenzas do better than most of the available summer onlys.

In snow and cold, no question that all season is the way to go (at least in comparison to summer tires) .

Of course, the all seasons will also wear better.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top