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I have 52000 miles on original Goodyear Eagle LS-2 ROF tires. 2/32 in front and 3/32 in rear. Dealer says not yet time to get new ones. I am primarily interested in tires which will help handling and with sway. I do not have the DHP option. Looking for tire recommendations.
 

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Those tires are done. Anything below 2/32nds inch is a safety violation in most states, even Floriduh. You set a record for those tires, though. RFT's in general are notorious for wearing out fast, and LS2's are notorious for wearing out on the edges even faster.

There's a consensus on BF that non-RFT's will transform your BMW. There's s storage area under you cargo floor big enough tot carry a mini-spare. A spare was a factory option on F15's, so you might already have one down there.

TireRack.com is your friend when it comes to tire shopping. You can set the tire selection filters: RFT or non-RFT, all-season or high performance, etc.
 

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Thanks for the info. I ordered the car without the third row seat but with the leveling suspension and the mini-spare tire. I could make the switch to non RFT.
 

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Thanks for the info. I ordered the car without the third row seat but with the leveling suspension and the mini-spare tire. I could make the switch to non RFT.
The dirty little secret is that you need a spare with RFT's if you plan on taking a road trip.

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=917185

Non-RFT's will make it seem like you're getting a new car... and a better car, too.

We ordered Frau Putzer's G01 X3 with the optional spare tire (option code 300) and with non-RFT's (option code 25X). Together, they're both free.
 

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I have 52000 miles on original Goodyear Eagle LS-2 ROF tires. 2/32 in front and 3/32 in rear. Dealer says not yet time to get new ones. I am primarily interested in tires which will help handling and with sway. I do not have the DHP option. Looking for tire recommendations.
Sorry to break the news that you put yourself, your passengers and... at risk riding tires that worn out. Don't be skimpy on tires and brakes, especially in raining and freezing/snowing weather. Shorter braking distance even just a few ft can make a huge ... again, huge difference! I would check tiresrack.com for reviews and then get the tires from Costco/Sams Club or local tire installers.
 

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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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I just learned this morning that the Town sand truck is OOC. It***8217;s been exciting skating around on marginal all seasons. Seven days to new snows.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Any thoughts on run-flat tires or not? My dealer has also taken the path of least resistance on other maintenance issues I will get them changed this week
 

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Sorry to break the news that you put yourself, your passengers and... at risk riding tires that worn out. Don't be skimpy on tires and brakes, especially in raining and freezing/snowing weather. Shorter braking distance even just a few ft can make a huge ... again, huge difference! I would check tiresrack.com for reviews and then get the tires from Costco/Sams Club or local tire installers.
There's a gray area where the definition of "safe" varies. When it's black-and-white, e.g. with state troopers, personal injury lawyers, juries and judges, and state inspection stations, it's 2/32nds inch.

The OP lives in California, where rain is less frequent than in most of the U.S., and where it doesn't snow. Snow definitely increases the minimum safe tread depth. There's a widespread consensus that you need 5/32nds inch of tread for snow.

I live in a place that can go six weeks without a drop of rain. (The indigenous plants get water from condensation, since during those six-week dry spells we still have high humidity.) I also live 50 miles from the nearest interstate. I've run several sets of tires down to 2/32nds inch here, but that was on cars that never went on long-distance road trips involving 70 MPH interstates.

All of my cars now are road trip cars. So, I replace the car or the tires when the tread depth on any tire gets down to 3/32nds inch. Because I hyper-manage time tires, the average tread depth then is usually below 4/32nds inch.
 

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Any thoughts on run-flat tires or not? My dealer has also taken the path of least resistance on other maintenance issues I will get them changed this week
There are millions of threads on RFT's vs. non-RFT's. The consensus is that RFT's ride much better, last longer, handle better, and cost less. You also get slightly better fuel economy (maybe 1%) with non-RFT's. LS2's are the worst tires ever made. So, going to non-RFT's will make you think you have a brand new X5, and a better one too.

The place where an RFT can be of benefit is if you have a blowout in a place where it's unsafe to change a tire. I've driven somewhere around one million miles in my life. I've only had one blowout, and that was caused by a defective rubber valve stem, not a tire failure. Modern BMW's have metal valve stems that are part of the TPMS. So, the root cause of my one blowout no longer exists. Modern tires are pretty good about holding onto nails and screws that puncture the tire, and only resulting in a slow leak. The TPMS will warn you of these slow leaks in time for you to get to a safe place to change a tire.

Since you have an OE spare tire and jack with your X5, the decision to go to non-RFT's would be much easier.

TireRack.com will lest every make and model tire that fits your X5. Then, you can filter the list down by brand, type (e.g. RFT vs. non-RFT, high performance vs. all-season). They also have a list of installers. Find one that uses a lever-less tire machine that doesn't scratch up your rims.
 

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There's a gray area where the definition of "safe" varies. When it's black-and-white, e.g. with state troopers, personal injury lawyers, juries and judges, and state inspection stations, it's 2/32nds inch.

The OP lives in California, where rain is less frequent than in most of the U.S., and where it doesn't snow. Snow definitely increases the minimum safe tread depth. There's a widespread consensus that you need 5/32nds inch of tread for snow.

I live in a place that can go six weeks without a drop of rain. (The indigenous plants get water from condensation, since during those six-week dry spells we still have high humidity.) I also live 50 miles from the nearest interstate. I've run several sets of tires down to 2/32nds inch here, but that was on cars that never went on long-distance road trips involving 70 MPH interstates.

All of my cars now are road trip cars. So, I replace the car or the tires when the tread depth on any tire gets down to 3/32nds inch. Because I hyper-manage time tires, the average tread depth then is usually below 4/32nds inch.
Well...., everyone has different perception about the risk, but a bit of education can help make the right decision .... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zA6MUlVNkLM
 
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