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I know this thread has been posted on this forum regarding valid entry with a permanent resident (green) card. If my family member has a passport from a different country along with a green card, does that suffice for entering Germany and traveling throughout the continental EU? If not, is there an EU visa that can be obtained?

Thanks.

Cessna
 

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May depend on the country of origin for the passport. With a Japanese passport and a U.S. Greencard (no longer Green though) there are no problems.
 

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I probably shouldn't do this, but I have spent much of the day dealing with visa requirements for visiting scholars to the U.S., so I'll give advice about Germany too.

WARNING: I am not an expert in this area, and this advice is worth--at best--what you are paying for it.

The following, I think, addresses your exact question and is from the website of the German Consulates in the U.S.:
First, look at the detailed list of countries from which visas are required. It is at:
http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/dipl...seUndAufenthalt/StaatenlisteVisumpflicht.html
(The detailed notes are very important.)

Then look at the FAQ--
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Q: My visa has been issued by the German Consulate, could I use this visa to make a sidetrip to other European countries (for example to France or Austria)?

A: Yes , you can. According to the Schengen agreement, visas are also valid for Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.
Please note, however, that you always have to apply at the consulate of the country which is your primary destination.
If you intend to visit several of the above-mentioned countries but do not have a primary destination, you should apply at the consulate of the country which is your first point of entry.

URL:
http://www.germany.info/relaunch/info/consular_services/visa/faq/a1.html
Several notes:
  1. This is a list mostly of EU members. It explicitly does not include Switzerland.
  2. It is more precisely a list of Schengen signatories, so it does include Norway, but does not include Ireland or the UK.
  3. (Snide remark to BMW) The Consulates alphabetize their list; you should try to do the same.
 

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N54
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I know this thread has been posted on this forum regarding valid entry with a permanent resident (green) card. If my family member has a passport from a different country along with a green card, does that suffice for entering Germany and traveling throughout the continental EU? If not, is there an EU visa that can be obtained?

Thanks.

Cessna
It really depends on which passport. A Canadian passport is different from, say, an Indian passport. So find out the requirements for the nationality in question (from the German consulate or its website).

To answer the second question, the Schengen visa is probably as close as it gets (covers most of the EU countries, I believe)
 

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Interesting question.

The greed card does not make any difference. You will be traveling on the passport from a certain contry, and that is all that matters.

As for the whole EU - once you arrive in the EU, there are no boarders any more (since 1993), so you can move about on the ground all you want. I wonder how this would play out with the visa though?
 

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I think what you need is an American, Canadian or Australian passport. They have reciprocity in regards to visa requirements.
 

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Running around in circles
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Call the consulate? :dunno:
 

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Green cards do not mean a thing except for re-entered the US. The Passport the person is traveling on will determine the need for a Visa. The Passport is the only means of determining a person country of citizenship.
 

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CarSwami
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Depending upon what type of passport the individual holds, a visa to enter Germany may be required. You can check the website of the German consulate-general/embassy to determine is required. If a visa is required, you'll need to get a Schengen visa that are valid for the bunch of countries listed in B-Y's posting above. But keep a couple of things in mind: you should get the Schengen visa from the consultate of the country that you will first enter the Schengen zone, i.e., if you first fly into Paris from the USA and take the train to Munich, you should get a Schengen visa from the French Consulate rather than the German Consulate. Also, the Schengen visa is not accepted in Switzerland or in the UK, so if you are planning travel to those countries as part of your ED trip, you'll need to determine whether your citizenship requires you to obtain separate visas for those countries.
 

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With the exception of EU and US citizens, most other people will need a visa to enter Germany and other EU states. The visa is called a Schengen visa (named after the town where the agreement was signed, I believe). You can apply for this visa at any of the participating countries' embassies/consulates and its the only visa you need to travel to any of the participating countries. Not all EU countries are part of the Schengen agreement.

You have to apply for the visa at the embassy/consulate of the country that is your main destination. I just traveled to Germany, Czech Republic and Netherland for my ED on a visa obtained from the German embassy in DC.

This site will give you all the info you need to apply:
http://germany.info/relaunch/info/consular_services/visa.html

And this link has a list of all countries where the visa is valid:
http://germany.info/relaunch/info/consular_services/visa/faq/a1.html
 

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Green cards do not mean a thing except for re-entered the US. The Passport the person is traveling on will determine the need for a Visa. The Passport is the only means of determining a person country of citizenship.
IMHO
Green Card holders do need to get Visas, but there is a small difference. If someone is from Country X, and has a US Green Card, and applies for a Visa to Germany, the chances of being approved are higher because the Green Card holder has a permanent residncy status in the US.

This is as opposed to a person from Country X with no US Green Card. Of course, it also depends on what Country X is? My definition of Country X countries would be 2nd/3rd World countries.
 

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IMHO
Green Card holders do need to get Visas, but there is a small difference. If someone is from Country X, and has a US Green Card, and applies for a Visa to Germany, the chances of being approved are higher because the Green Card holder has a permanent residncy status in the US.

This is as opposed to a person from Country X with no US Green Card. Of course, it also depends on what Country X is? My definition of Country X countries would be 2nd/3rd World countries.
My daughter just came from Germany/Austria for a Columbus Choir tour. The other one will go there on June for another choir tour. We are GC holder but an Australian passport holder. We did inquire and we were informed that US, Canadian and Australian passport holder don't need a visa. Hope this will help.
 

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IMHO
Green Card holders do need to get Visas, but there is a small difference. If someone is from Country X, and has a US Green Card, and applies for a Visa to Germany, the chances of being approved are higher because the Green Card holder has a permanent residncy status in the US.

This is as opposed to a person from Country X with no US Green Card. Of course, it also depends on what Country X is? My definition of Country X countries would be 2nd/3rd World countries.
The non-green card holder will have to get their visa in their home country, the european country consulate here in the US will not issue them visas.
 

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Interesting question.

The greed card does not make any difference.
It does, if you're going to Switzerland. GC holders do not need a visa to enter Switzerland.

Otherwise, you must check the embassies of every country you plan on visiting to see their visa requirements.
 

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Visa Required to Germany and Continental Europe

IMHO
Green Card holders do need to get Visas, but there is a small difference. If someone is from Country X, and has a US Green Card, and applies for a Visa to Germany, the chances of being approved are higher because the Green Card holder has a permanent residncy status in the US.

This is as opposed to a person from Country X with no US Green Card. Of course, it also depends on what Country X is? My definition of Country X countries would be 2nd/3rd World countries.
This is bad advice. CarSwami above gave excellent and correct information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Awesome! Thank you guys for all the responses. I will call the German Consulate since our flight is to Munich and inquire about the Schengen visa.
 

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This is bad advice. CarSwami above gave excellent and correct information.
First, its is just an opinion, not advice :). I am not sure how you find it bad advice?

The US GC may just make it a bit easier get a German visa (without which, they may not).
 

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Awesome! Thank you guys for all the responses. I will call the German Consulate since our flight is to Munich and inquire about the Schengen visa.
You are welcome. Good idea. Please also get your International drivers Permit. Plan well. You are about to have the experience of your life. Enjoy. Peace!!
 

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N54
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The non-green card holder will have to get their visa in their home country, the european country consulate here in the US will not issue them visas.
There's some dubious advice in this thread, but this really takes the cake. Unless this is a new rule I don't know about, then this (as a blanket statement) is just plain wrong.

:thumbdwn:
 

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N54
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Green cards do not mean a thing except for re-entered the US. The Passport the person is traveling on will determine the need for a Visa. The Passport is the only means of determining a person country of citizenship.
Do you know ALL the permutations for citizens of country X wishing to visit country Y? Again, as a blanket statement, this is just wrong. :thumbdwn:

There have been plenty of instances where country Y will require nationals of country X to obtain a visa, but will waive that requirement if said person holds a US GC

You can even find examples of having only Form I-512 (Adv. Parole, i.e. pre GC stage) is sufficient to waive a visa requirement
 
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