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Hello fellow members

I am sure many of you will have visited this excellent site. However for those of you who have not here is the link:

http://www.bmw-plant-dingolfing.com/dingolfing/htdocs/lowband/com/en/index.html

If it does not work then copy and paste the link into your browser. Also allow the web site to run through its introduction and then you are able to watch individual video clips with English commentary on each of the 6 separate aspects of manufacture.

We can then have a quiz amongst members to see if we have learnt all the possible facts about the 5 series and the Dingolfing plant. Eg:
Q: How many buses are used daily to transport workers to the plant?
A: 300

Regards

Limey1
 

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3 pedals only!
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Thanks for the link. The plant is well worth a tour if you get the opportunity.

Dingolfing is about 45 minutes from Munich, and a tour is free if you're doing ED.
 

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Takin' Care of Business
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My Dingolfing, my Dingolfing, I want to go to my Dingolfing

Thank you and good nite
Thanks a lot. Now I can't get that d*mn song out of my head!
 

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Does that mean they charge if you're not doing ED?
There's nothing on the website that mentions a charge for the tour.
 

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3 pedals only!
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Does that mean they charge if you're not doing ED?
I've heard that there is a nominal fee (€5-10) for a random person off the street to do the tour. However, this might only apply to the Munich Plant, which is right next to the Welt. Understandably, it is quite the tourist attraction.

When I contacted them, I stated I was going to be there on an ED trip, and I'd like to schedule an English language tour. They sent me a confirmation letter, with a specified time to arrive at the plant. They never asked for any proof that I was indeed participating in ED. This was in 2006, so things may have changed.

While I haven't been in the Munich plant, and I thus am relying on second hand accounts, the tour in Dingolfing seems superior. The Munich plant has elevated walkways specifically for large numbers of tour participants. In Dingolfing, we wandered around the production floor in a group of about 10 people. The tour went something like this. We first saw a short presentation on the facility. After that, we toured the robotic welding area where they built many of the subassemblies used to form the body, as well as the robotic inventory storage system used to store the work in process prior to it being used in the body shop.

From there, we saw the body shop, where they put the subassemblies together to form a recognizable car. In this section, the cars are randomly mixed on the assembly line. I saw a 5er, 5er touring, 7er, and 6er vert all running down the same line.

From there, we saw the large stamping press used to form the main body panels, and then toured the area where they put together the Aluminum front end of the car.

After that, we saw the final assembly area, including the testing dyno where each car is put through its paces. (Every car coming off the line has seen 160 kph.)
 

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I've heard that there is a nominal fee (€5-10) for a random person off the street to do the tour. However, this might only apply to the Munich Plant, which is right next to the Welt. Understandably, it is quite the tourist attraction.

When I contacted them, I stated I was going to be there on an ED trip, and I'd like to schedule an English language tour. They sent me a confirmation letter, with a specified time to arrive at the plant. They never asked for any proof that I was indeed participating in ED. This was in 2006, so things may have changed.

While I haven't been in the Munich plant, and I thus am relying on second hand accounts, the tour in Dingolfing seems superior. The Munich plant has elevated walkways specifically for large numbers of tour participants. In Dingolfing, we wandered around the production floor in a group of about 10 people. The tour went something like this. We first saw a short presentation on the facility. After that, we toured the robotic welding area where they built many of the subassemblies used to form the body, as well as the robotic inventory storage system used to store the work in process prior to it being used in the body shop.

From there, we saw the body shop, where they put the subassemblies together to form a recognizable car. In this section, the cars are randomly mixed on the assembly line. I saw a 5er, 5er touring, 7er, and 6er vert all running down the same line.

From there, we saw the large stamping press used to form the main body panels, and then toured the area where they put together the Aluminum front end of the car.

After that, we saw the final assembly area, including the testing dyno where each car is put through its paces. (Every car coming off the line has seen 160 kph.)
Close up factory tours are great. Years ago I did the Porsche factory tour in Stuttgart, followed by the Porsche museum tour. Amazing. I had recently taken delivery of my first Porsche, and it was as if I'd visited Mecca.
 

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Here for life!!!
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Thank you!
 

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I've heard that there is a nominal fee (€5-10) for a random person off the street to do the tour. However, this might only apply to the Munich Plant, which is right next to the Welt. Understandably, it is quite the tourist attraction.

When I contacted them, I stated I was going to be there on an ED trip, and I'd like to schedule an English language tour. They sent me a confirmation letter, with a specified time to arrive at the plant. They never asked for any proof that I was indeed participating in ED. This was in 2006, so things may have changed.

While I haven't been in the Munich plant, and I thus am relying on second hand accounts, the tour in Dingolfing seems superior. The Munich plant has elevated walkways specifically for large numbers of tour participants. In Dingolfing, we wandered around the production floor in a group of about 10 people. The tour went something like this. We first saw a short presentation on the facility. After that, we toured the robotic welding area where they built many of the subassemblies used to form the body, as well as the robotic inventory storage system used to store the work in process prior to it being used in the body shop.

From there, we saw the body shop, where they put the subassemblies together to form a recognizable car. In this section, the cars are randomly mixed on the assembly line. I saw a 5er, 5er touring, 7er, and 6er vert all running down the same line.

From there, we saw the large stamping press used to form the main body panels, and then toured the area where they put together the Aluminum front end of the car.

After that, we saw the final assembly area, including the testing dyno where each car is put through its paces. (Every car coming off the line has seen 160 kph.)
So much for the "take it easy on the car during break in" routine!! :D
 

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So much for the "take it easy on the car during break in" routine!! :D
160 km/h is within the break-in guidelines--from owners manual:

Up to 1,200 miles/2,000 km:
You should attempt to vary both engine and
vehicle speeds. Until the break-in period has
been completed, you should also refrain from
exceeding an engine speed of 4,500 rpm or a
driving speed of 100 mph/160 km/h.
 

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160 km/h is within the break-in guidelines--from owners manual:

Up to 1,200 miles/2,000 km:
You should attempt to vary both engine and
vehicle speeds. Until the break-in period has
been completed, you should also refrain from
exceeding an engine speed of 4,500 rpm or a
driving speed of 100 mph/160 km/h.
The upper threshold or VNE speed to pilots. I just thought it humorous that we all try so hard to baby the cars on break in and BMW runs them to 160 km/h right off the line. :D
 
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