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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter #1
Although inspired by political events, let's keep politics out of this question.

What have you or someone you know sacrificed?

Are these sacrifices?
1. Mother has a good paying occupation but does not work because she believes raising children and not using day care is more important. Is that a sacrifice? Or just a preference? Or a mix of both?

2. Someone works overtime in order to save up some money?

3. Someone forfeits partying and studies for several years in order to get a difficult to earn degree, such as becoming an orthopedic surgeon or a partner at a famous law firm?

4. Someone who supports a spouse going to school instead of that spouse going into debt?

5. Someone who tries to save money and does all the yard work? Or is that not sacrifice because they have a yard?

6. Someone who works all evening to seal a deal that earns them hundreds of millions? If they went home at 5 pm, a competitor would seal the deal.

7. Someone who donates a kidney to a friend.

8. Someone who shields their child from bullets and dies.

9. Someone who forfeits ice cream and eating out to save money for the family and themselves.

10. Someone who takes care of an elderly parent with moderate dementia.

11. Someone who doesn't smoke even though they want to.

12. Someone who wants a Maserati but buys a CPO BMW 3 series.

13. Someone who makes a big donation to a charitable organization.

14. Someone who wants to stay at home in the evening after work but campaigns for a politician.

15. Someone who is tired but reads bedtime stories to their children.
 

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Well, I lost my hearing during Desert Storm, now I have to wear a pair of hearing aids, Is that one of them?
 

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Worlds Foremost Authority
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Well, I lost my hearing during Desert Storm, now I have to wear a pair of hearing aids, Is that one of them?
That is definitely a sacrifice but it pales in comparison to the sacrifices made by Donald Trump.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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didnt last long...
 

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Well, I lost my hearing during Desert Storm, now I have to wear a pair of hearing aids, Is that one of them?
Without a doubt. And thank you for your service and sacrifice. Very humbling.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Without a doubt. And thank you for your service and sacrifice. Very humbling.
What about "thank you for your service"? One recent veteran told me that he felt weird being told that. He said he joined because there weren't many job prospects after high school and that it provided a skill and money for college later.

Another recent veteran said that he was in Iraq but very safe. He was in the middle of a very large base and just did paperwork. He said those that go out on patrols are subjected to danger and loss of limbs but most of those in the base are perfectly safe and displayed no bravery.

On the other hand, if you lose a leg or eye, or even have a hearing impairment, that is a sacrifice so having others realize that may help.

Why do people join? Some, as mentioned above, do it for career. I heard of one and know another that did out of patriotism, both of them even earning less money than they could have in civilian life. One frequently told others of his service and felt that they didn't credit him for the sacrifice (financial and minor injury, not limb loss) that he went through.

With 1.2 million people in the service, there are many different stories, many sacrifices, many lack of sacrifice, happy stories, sad stories, etc. So a presumption of sacrifice and "thank you for your service" is appropriate.
 

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1st Cav!
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What about "thank you for your service"? One recent veteran told me that he felt weird being told that. He said he joined because there weren't many job prospects after high school and that it provided a skill and money for college later.

Another recent veteran said that he was in Iraq but very safe. He was in the middle of a very large base and just did paperwork. He said those that go out on patrols are subjected to danger and loss of limbs but most of those in the base are perfectly safe and displayed no bravery.

On the other hand, if you lose a leg or eye, or even have a hearing impairment, that is a sacrifice so having others realize that may help.

Why do people join? Some, as mentioned above, do it for career. I heard of one and know another that did out of patriotism, both of them even earning less money than they could have in civilian life. One frequently told others of his service and felt that they didn't credit him for the sacrifice (financial and minor injury, not limb loss) that he went through.

With 1.2 million people in the service, there are many different stories, many sacrifices, many lack of sacrifice, happy stories, sad stories, etc. So a presumption of sacrifice and "thank you for your service" is appropriate.
I feel mostly the same way, this isn't the WWII generation, we aren't conscripted and no one joins for pure patriotism. The job offers great experience, steady pay and outstanding benefits. However, I will say that if you are in theater, Iraq or Afghanistan, there is no safe place. In 2011 I was in Camp Victory for a week which is one of the largest, most fortified, multi-branch and multinational bases where Saddam's palace is and it was hit with mortar fire at least twice a day. That was the first time I've ever experienced the dreaded IDF alarm. We deployed to our forward outpost and were actually hit less on base. I also don't agree with the fact that people who go on patrol are the most exposed to danger. They may go out looking for it but they are constantly moving and are accompanied by 16 other Soldiers who are in full kit ready to respond to a threat. In retrospect when you're on base you usually are not wearing kit and the enemy has your location dialed in because they've probably been hitting that base for years now, just a matter of luck whether or not the mortar will land in your pocket or in an open field 100 yards away from you. Not to take away anything from the war fighters, just saying the danger is real no matter where you are in theater.

On another note, thank you to everyone on this board who sent me care packages while I was deployed :thumbup:. Most of them don't post anymore but it was much appreciated.
 

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Sacrifices? I don't think we really have, not in the grand scheme of things. I have a decent job, but not nearly enough income to afford a new BMW or probably any new car without giving up my hobby cars, so I drive used. My wife quit working when she got pregnant with our older son. That was 33 years ago. Health issues forced her to stay at home after that. Again, I don't think we sacrificed anything, except maybe fancy vacations. We live in a modest house and always have food in the kitchen (unless we don't feel like going to the store). The bills are always paid on time and there's a little money left over at the end of the month. I drive two fairly modern, fully loaded vehicles that didn't cost near what they were worth. Also, our sons are out there in the real world working and married with their own homes. Been married to the same woman for over 34 years and she likes my car stuff (and me most of the time) and still have my friends and most of my health...

So, no I don't think I've sacrificed. I'm blessed.
 

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I don't know if this counts but it immediately springs to mind for me:

I worked a job I grew to absolutely hate for 13 years. I didn't do it for myself; I did it for my wife and my parents. Day after day after day I drug myself there and back, filled with misery and self-loathing.

I did it for my wife because I wanted her to be happy and believe that everything was ok. I didn't want her to worry about anything. I did it for my parents because they were proud of the job I had and getting near the end of their lives. I know my mom particularly liked to talk about what I was doing to friends.

One day I couldn't take it anymore and started to tell the clients I worked with that I was leaving. Some suggested I go it alone. I'll never forget how nervous I was the first time I worked for someone on my own. When I finally left the company completely plenty of clients followed. To try to describe the difference in the quality of my life now would be like trying to describe the vastness of the universe. I don't even have to advertise. I get more referrals than I can handle.

Is it sacrifice? I don't know. I do know that I didn't work there all of those awful years for myself.
 

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Everyone sacrifices every day, it's just the degree that's different. Sacrifices, big and small, occur continually. But, when you start to compare them, you see the difference (or dig yourself a political hole). In OP - contrast #8 vs. #12. Yes, in #12 you sacrificed the nicer car for your financial comfort, but it's doesn't exactly compare to giving your life in #8.
 

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My father was drafted and served in Viet Nam. He also feels weird when someone says thank you for your service to him. He typically responds, don't thank me...I did not want to be there. Thank someone that volunteered to serve.
 

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Since this whole "sacrifice" thing came out of the political campaign, it seems to me that many people have missed the point. What we are really talking about here is sacrifice for one's country. Captain Kahn made the ultimate sacrifice for his country. His parents sacrificed their son. Justin T's dad could be said to have sacrificed a couple of years of his life (involuntarily due to the draft.)

I joined the Navy and ended up serving for 25 years. I never got shot at or had to shoot at anyone. I was assigned to a variety of locations, some pretty nice and some pretty awful and did a variety of duties, some enjoyable and some not so much. But all things considered, I really don't think there was much sacrifice involved.

Which brings up another current term that bothers me: Hero. Way overused. Being killed or wounded in the military does NOT make you a hero. You have to actively do something heroic to be a hero. We've got plenty of heroes, but many of those killed or wounded were just casualties. To again personalize this, in 25 years of active service I never did anything heroic. I like to think that, had circumstances warranted, I could have risen to the occasion, but circumstances never warranted. So I have to be content with my status as a veteran of 25 years who made minimal sacrifice and was not a hero. I accept that. And I also accept that I am in the minority on this "hero" thing, although I believe many veterans would agree with me.

I'm sure we all know this, but of all those who serve in the military, a significant majority are in support roles: administration, supply, equipment repair, food service, etc. etc. All those contribute to the mission, but the opportunity to fall on a hand grenade, thereby heroically saving one's comrades, is extremely limited when preparing box lunches for aircrew flying rubber dog sh!t in and out of Hong Kong...
 

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Maybe I misunderstood the point but none of the 15 things the OP listed have to do with sacrificing for one's country. I thought the point was to get people to think about sacrifice in general.
 

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We sacrifice to have a house with a 1/2 acre, pool, and 4 bedrooms so the kids could grow up with a nice place to play. Costs way more than my old 3-bedroom on 7000sf of land.
I sacrifice not getting a Ferrari, settling for a M Roadster, because the wife thinks saving for retirement is more important and cars are a waste of money.
I've sacrificed a weekend every year for the last 10+ years for ACS Relay For Life.
 

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I was drafted into the US Army in 1967 and served 12 months in an artillery unit in Vietnam. I wear hearing aids, too.

I raised two wonderful kids into adulthood and both are well employed, happy and doing well.

I've was steadily employed at a job outside the home since age 11. 52 years in the work force. I retired 4.5 years ago.

I managed my aging aunt's financial affairs, plus care-giving, for 7 years. She had no children.

I traveled to the aid of mom and step-dad 3 times last year alone, staying a total of 5+ weeks at their home... far away from my home.

Now, do I call this sacrifice?

No, I call it duty. I wouldn't have done it any other way. :D
 

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Freude am Fahren
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We sacrifice to have a house with a 1/2 acre, pool, and 4 bedrooms so the kids could grow up with a nice place to play. Costs way more than my old 3-bedroom on 7000sf of land.
I sacrifice not getting a Ferrari, settling for a M Roadster, because the wife thinks saving for retirement is more important and cars are a waste of money.
I've sacrificed a weekend every year for the last 10+ years for ACS Relay For Life.
No Ferrari?
ImageUploadedByBimmerApp1470291960.717866.jpg
 

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I think a true sacrifice is something near and dear you give up but you have joy (or at least no regret) over giving it up for someone.

Unfortunately, with that definition, my list is very weak. My wife and i homeschooled our daughter and gave up "stuff" to accomplish that but i don't rank that as sacrifice.
 

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I know. It totally sucks.

If I could find an F430 for $50k or less that wasn't a salvage title - maybe an angry soon-to-be-ex-wife getting revenge on the cheating husband type situation, I could convince the wife that it was a good investment.
 

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That is definitely a sacrifice but it pales in comparison to the sacrifices made by Donald Trump.
Hillary definitely has Trump beat in the sacrifice department: She sacrificed Ambassador Stevens and his crew to help cover up her arms deal; or did you think she did it for fun?
 
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