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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I bought a 2017 X5 msport edition and is been great, until the snow fell. I have 20" rims with offset tires (275/40 front and 315/35 in the back) and I have been sliding all over the road in the snow. Got into an accident yesterday hitting the guard rail on a hwy because I went sideways. I currently have all weather run flat tires. My question is should I get winter tires for these rims, if so what brand do you recommend, or should I get smaller rims and winter tires for example 18" wheels. A buddy of mine told me my wheel size is too large for snow driving. I would rather get tires for these wheels but I want to be safe so any advice you can give would be great. This is my only car so I need it to work in the snow.

I've also been looking into the used tire market, ie Craigslist, and I'm curious to know how many miles can winter tires last for. I've seen that tire rack says 15000 miles. I have a seller looking to sell tires with 6000 miles of driving. Is that a good purchase?

Thanks guys.
 

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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 121K miles NOKIAN WR G3 30K miles
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First get snow tires, smaller width doesn't 'float' so on the snow/slush. I prefer NOKIAN and when these OE CPO Bridgesktones are done, they'all be replaced with NOKIAN Weatherproof SUV.
 

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Normally, I agree with Doug. And I'm a huge Nokian fan myself (BTW, Tire Rack doesn't carry them). That said, given the context of the question, I'd say FOURTH, get new snow tires. First, find an indy shop worthy of your trust. Second, get four thinner, smaller, and "square" (i.e., same sized) rims. Third, get the correct TPMS sensors. I ended up getting some used E70 snows off Craigslist, but my Indy shop had to swap the TPMS sensors. Then fourth, buy a set of snow tires.

All of this is much discussed in these forums. Contributor edycol has many thoughtful things to say about snow tires. Some of my own questions about tires have links to online tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Normally, I agree with Doug. And I'm a huge Nokian fan myself (BTW, Tire Rack doesn't carry them). That said, given the context of the question, I'd say FOURTH, get new snow tires. First, find an indy shop worthy of your trust. Second, get four thinner, smaller, and "square" (i.e., same sized) rims. Third, get the correct TPMS sensors. I ended up getting some used E70 snows off Craigslist, but my Indy shop had to swap the TPMS sensors. Then fourth, but a set of snow tires.

All of this is much discussed in these forums. Contributor edycol has many thoughtful things to say about snow tires. Some of my own questions about tires have links to online tools.
By thinner, smaller, square rims you mean get 18" rims or stick with 20". I'm a real newbie so what would I look for in terms of getting thinner 20" rims. I'm searching ebay and found these. What do you guys think?

http://m.ebay.com/itm/BMW-X5-Sport-Y-Spoke-214-staggered-wheels-and-Pirelli-Winter-runflat-tires-snow-/182409797223?nav=WATCHING_ACTIVE
 

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I currently have all weather run flat tires.
The issue lies in the tires. Resolve that by installing proper snow/ice/winter tires and you will see improved results however run flat tires in general are very hard and in the cold (despite a winter compound) are still rather hard and not the most efficient tire however it is the most convenient. If you have a spare then try to find a set of non-rft winter tires and you will see a significant improvement in manageability of the vehicle.
 

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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 121K miles NOKIAN WR G3 30K miles
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IIRC NOKIAN addresses proper seasonal compounds at length on their site.

I selected NOKIAN for their experience providing tires for the Arctic countries.
 

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By thinner, smaller, square rims you mean get 18"
Yes, a dedicated set of snows for Connecticut is exactly what I mean, and I'd suggest the 18" rims. BTW, I drove in Connecticut on Thursday, and left before the snow hit. I have a pretty good idea what CT roads are like in the spring. More sidewall is better, especially if you'll be on I-95 at all. Hope you weren't part of that huge pileup on Friday night.

BTW, Tire Rack's regional hub is located behind BDL airport. Most people don't know that, because it's not very showy. It's a nondescript warehouse in a sea of equally nondescript warehouses. But they have a sales counter (no service), so you can save yourself some shipping, if you're near Hartford, and you choose to buy new. Amusingly, you will be surprised at how much of your cargo area (and back seat) a full set of X5 tires consumes.

Back to your car: please take a look at my "on the vehicle" post:

https://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=936623

Suggest you play with this, which does a nice job of showing "offset" (how far a given rim extends/recesses from the plane of the underlying (vehicle) hub. With the M-Sport package, you have extra body moldings, and you may wish to accommodate those.

http://www.rimsntires.com/specspro.jsp

Also try the mockup engine at Tire Rack. It's great.

Wow, those really are beautiful. But that wouldn't be my preference for utility in CT. I went with a frumpier 18" wheel, and I'm okay with that, for ~120 days per year.

Also, those will have the "wrong" E70 TMPS, as did the ones I got off Craigslist. That's not a huge deal, because they have long-life batteries. But nothing lasts forever. A TMPS module has a half-life, and those are perhaps there. At some point, the batteries die. On a 2009 vehicle used "a few years," you might be looking at the end of the TMPS modules anyway. So even though you'd need to spend a few hundred to have the TPMS modules replaced (and pay to break the bead, reseat the tires, etc...), you'd push their expiration date out maybe 8 years.

In short: I don't think those are the wheels for your winter situation. That's my opinion. But they are nice. :)

Finally, you may or may not require RFTs. Watch that.
 

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OP, are you even sure you have all weather tires (instead of summers)? I dont remember the 20s being available in all weather on M sport... only summer tires (with increased top speed limiter).

Check your vin with Bimmer.work and see if you have "increased top speed limiter".. if you DO have that, then your car was delivered with summer tires, not all seasons. I dont live where it snows so I cant advise you on that, other than to say that if I DID live where it snowed, I would get a dedicated set of 18s (square setup) based on the excellent tire and wheel advice I have read on this site over the past year on this topic.
 

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I have same 2017 X5 M-sport with 20" staggered wheels. I had 2012 X5 M-sport with same 20" wheel setup and had BMW 209 18" wheels I bought off Craigslist. I swapped out TPMS for F15 and installed Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2 255/55-18 and they are awesome tires. I drove into Boston Celtics game last night and did not have any issues. Hit may sections of road where drifts and poor plowing on Rt 24 and never strayed at all while driving at decent speeds (40-55mph depending on traffic and road). I would recommend getting 18" for reasons stated above about NewEngland pot holes and the extra profile smooths out that until the spring. If you didn't get the spare tire kit you may want to get one so you can swap out the run-flats when they wear out and also makes snow tire selection better if not looking for run-flats.
 

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After getting winter tires, also consider turning on traction control (and DSC off) if the conditions are pretty slick.

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Huh? Traction control is always ON.

M Sport 20" wheels don't come with all seasons, there's not a tire that would fit the wheels that's winter or all season in RFT. They're summer tires.
 

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Huh? Traction control is always ON.
If I remember the website correctly, it has three modes. If my understanding is correct:

Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) is on by default. It's the "Hey, let's not tip over the SUV" algorithm. Put differently, in a top-heavy 300+ HP vehicle, it's possible to have too much grip on dry pavement, going into dry corners. Or, more accurately: at moment, tip-over can be controlled with clever application of power and individual brakes, such that the car neither tips nor oversteers. Of course, that just means the fool behind the wheel will try a wee bit faster, next time through the same curve, but I digress...

Pushing that button once gives you "Traction Control." In other words, the algorithm stops worrying so much about tip-over, and concerns itself almost entirely with grip. I assume it allows just enough wheel spin to pack the (winter) treads with a snow load. So my understanding is that the system is "on," yes, but it's being used to different effect - in this case, getting you out of a snowbank.

Holding that button down for 10-20 seconds gives you full Yee-Haw, w00t! mode, with snow rooster-tails and all the insurance-canceling, grin-inducing foolishness that might result.:bigpimp:
 

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I bought a 2017 X5 msport edition and is been great, until the snow fell. I have 20" rims with offset tires (275/40 front and 315/35 in the back) and I have been sliding all over the road in the snow. Got into an accident yesterday hitting the guard rail on a hwy because I went sideways. I currently have all weather run flat tires. My question is should I get winter tires for these rims, if so what brand do you recommend, or should I get smaller rims and winter tires for example 18" wheels. A buddy of mine told me my wheel size is too large for snow driving. I would rather get tires for these wheels but I want to be safe so any advice you can give would be great. This is my only car so I need it to work in the snow.

I've also been looking into the used tire market, ie Craigslist, and I'm curious to know how many miles can winter tires last for. I've seen that tire rack says 15000 miles. I have a seller looking to sell tires with 6000 miles of driving. Is that a good purchase?

Thanks guys.
First of all, I am sorry that happened.
Second, you DO NOT have all weather tire:
a. Those tires are scam anyway.
2. BMW does not put all weather tires on their cars, especially on staggered M packages. You most likely have max performance summer tires and be happy you are alive

That being said, best option is:
Go down to 255/55 R18. Get wheels in local Discount Tire or Tire Rack. I paid wheels for my E70 35d $116.
What tire to get? So far all people who chimed in had great proposals, but not all winter tires are same, and some are much better in ice and dry then deep snow and slush.

1. Nokian Hakka. R2 that Doug recommended is uber tire for worst conditions. It will go thru anything. However, the better the tire is in deeps snow, slush etc. the worse is on dry. Nokian is made to maximize deeps snow, slush and ice performance and speed index of S indicates that. If you drive a lot on interstate, this might not be best tire. If you ski a lot, drive local roads that are not cleaned properly, than it is best choice. They are expensive, especially RFT! I think I was quoted $310 for RFT per tire in 255/55 R18.
2. Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2 is great choice for rough weather. I have it now and it is much cheaper, but does not come in RFT option. It is very aggressive, and it will go thru deep snow like nothing. I would say Nokian would be bit better in deep snow and slush (maybe noticeable difference in slush) but Blizzak will be better on dry roads. Expect 20K life span.
3. Michelin Latitute Xi2 is interesting tire. It has warranty of 40K. However, that is 2/32 and winter tires below 5/32 are not usable in real world. Emphasis of this tire is on ice and packed snow and cold dry performance. It is probably best tire for cleaned interstates. It will provide smoothest, all season kind of ride, and will not wear out fast.

You can go with Euro winter tires like Continental TS830P, Pirelli Scorpion Winter or Scorpion Ice and Snow. All these tires are great for interstates and ice and slush. Deep snow not that much, but it will get you where you going.
Best thing is to avoid RFT and get spare. You will save bunch of money and f you drive in the city, keep AAA membership and get good compressor. Outside of city, just pack spare in compartment in trunk if you do not have 3rd row. If you do, oh well, I just put spare in trunk and tie it down.
 

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If I remember the website correctly, it has three modes. If my understanding is correct:

Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) is on by default. It's the "Hey, let's not tip over the SUV" algorithm. Put differently, in a top-heavy 300+ HP vehicle, it's possible to have too much grip on dry pavement, going into dry corners. Or, more accurately: at moment, tip-over can be controlled with clever application of power and individual brakes, such that the car neither tips nor oversteers. Of course, that just means the fool behind the wheel will try a wee bit faster, next time through the same curve, but I digress...

Pushing that button once gives you "Traction Control." In other words, the algorithm stops worrying so much about tip-over, and concerns itself almost entirely with grip. I assume it allows just enough wheel spin to pack the (winter) treads with a snow load. So my understanding is that the system is "on," yes, but it's being used to different effect - in this case, getting you out of a snowbank.

Holding that button down for 10-20 seconds gives you full Yee-Haw, w00t! mode, with snow rooster-tails and all the insurance-canceling, grin-inducing foolishness that might result.:bigpimp:
TC as well as DSC is always on.
TC is good, but it can get you in serious trouble if you need to dig your self out of snow or correct tail fish.
 

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TC as well as DSC is always on.

TC is good, but it can get you in serious trouble if you need to dig your self out of snow or correct tail fish.
My super over simplified way of looking at the DSC v TC is full DSC will apply power or braking to each wheel independently as required to maintain stability of the vehicle during most driving conditions. TC alone is similar, with the important exception that it won't apply the brakes to any wheel so traction is prioritized.

If you run DSC in slippery conditions, you may (and I have) have the brakes applied to a wheel, causing it to lock and break free. This is not optimal.

Try it out in a safe controlled environment. Then you may choose which you prefer. I have 35 years of driving front, rear and all wheel drive vehicle in snow and ice, and find my preference is TC in the snow and not DSC. YMMV.

Sent from my iPhone using Bimmerfest mobile app
 

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@OP, I am almost positive you dont have all weather tires unless you purchased them after the fact. I remembered your user name but could not remember WHY I remembered it, and went and looked. I helped you with your negotiations on the car (I totally remember it now). I am so sorry you had the issue sliding around, but you are actually lucky it was not worse if you were driving in snow on summer tires. Kinda like driving on hockey pucks.

If you want to make the "easy" choice, you could go back to the dealership you purchased from and get a wheel and tire package with snows. A lot of times they will have a special on them. Since they wanted to keep you happy on car purchase and came down at the very end to a very reasonable number, you could go back to that GM and ask about purchasing a wheel and tire package (18 inch square setup with one of the tires the nice folks here are recommending).

You simply do NOT want to drive with the summers in the snow, if in fact you have summers like we suspect.
 

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I have 20" rims with offset tires (275/40 front and 315/35 in the back) and I have been sliding all over the road in the snow. Got into an accident yesterday hitting the guard rail on a hwy because I went sideways. I currently have all weather run flat tires. My question is should I get winter tires for these rims, if so what brand do you recommend, or should I get smaller rims and winter tires for example 18" wheels. A buddy of mine told me my wheel size is too large for snow driving. I would rather get tires for these wheels but I want to be safe so any advice you can give would be great. This is my only car so I need it to work in the snow.
As others have mentioned your car has SUMMER tires. Nobody makes tires in that size that are all season RFT.

Here's my experience from driving in NJ this winter. I run 275 315 staggered Pirelli Scorpion Snow & Ice RFT. They are categorized as performance winter tires which means they are designed to be biased towards highway speeds on cold weather asphalt roads that are CLEAR. Not so much deep snow or ice. So yesterday at the height of the blizzard I'm driving in 2-4" of unplowed snow and slush. Even at 30-40 mph the rear end of the car is not really what I would call planted. It feels like the wide 315 rear tires are surfing on the snow at times. Driving around was manageable but I definitely had to adjust my driving to compensate for the rear traction. Also, I have the 40e which has an extra 500lbs battery in the back.

My advice if the primary concern is traction in deep snow is to maybe choose a winter/snow/ice category tire and/or narrower tire tread.

My other winter car is an AWD minivan with 225 width Nokian WRG3 All Weather tires and it felt much more planted in the unplowed snow/slush than the X5.
 

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My super over simplified way of looking at the DSC v TC is full DSC will apply power or braking to each wheel independently as required to maintain stability of the vehicle during most driving conditions. TC alone is similar, with the important exception that it won't apply the brakes to any wheel so traction is prioritized.

If you run DSC in slippery conditions, you may (and I have) have the brakes applied to a wheel, causing it to lock and break free. This is not optimal.

Try it out in a safe controlled environment. Then you may choose which you prefer. I have 35 years of driving front, rear and all wheel drive vehicle in snow and ice, and find my preference is TC in the snow and not DSC. YMMV.

Sent from my iPhone using Bimmerfest mobile app
DSC will help you if you start sliding in curve. It will try to "bounce" you back by braking one wheel.
TC will try to limit your power until wheels reach same revolution. If one wheel is slipping, TC will get applied. Works great going forward from stop light in ice. In deeper snow, slush it will limit revolutions of tires and prevent proper self cleaning, which is the most important thing driving thru deep snow, slush etc. Most of the cars that have problem climbing passes or get stuck in local unplowed streets are the cars with very aggressive TC system.
Tried all that while I worked as test driver, and my preference is really good snow tires and my own judgment.
 

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Last winter my stock 19 m sport wheels with all weather tires performed very lousily in the snow so i invested in a dedicated staggered summer setup and am using the stock wheels as a winter setup with Hakkapellita R2 by Nokian. Best decision i ever made as confirmed by NJ's road conditions yesterday. Highly recommend the R2's.

 
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