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Discussion Starter #1
I made sure to read every possible thread i could before posting but I am truly at a loss. I had gotten the engine running great and it was ready for a coolant fill. I refilled the coolant very carefully following instructions and tips from several videos and the car would still get hot, but i only took it a mile or so up the street so it wasn’t in the red for very long. I had an oil leak that required me to drain the coolant anyway and start the whole process over. I parked the car on a very steep hill and filled with coolant with the heater at 90 and bleeder screw off. I then put a piece of vinyl hose in the bleed screw hole and ran the car go a little bit so the coolant flowed back into the expansion tank. I noticed there was a few small bubbles exert 15-20 seconds or so that would shoot through the clear tubing. I left the car running for 5 minutes or so like this and the tiny infrequent bubbles were still going but I figured it was nothing. i then let the car cool, filled more coolant until the bleeder valve was weeping and bubble free, put the screw in and sucked out coolant until the bobber read perfectly.
I started the car and let it idle for 20 minutes sitting still and the needle stayed upright the whole time. I then took it about a half mile up the street before the temp needle started taking a little walk over to the red zone. I noticed that the car seemed to accelerate slower than usual even when the temp needle was perfectly upright. It is also worth noting that the radiator didn’t even seem hardly warm after 20 minutes or so idling in park. Any guesses? I really hope it’s not anything to do with combustion gas leaking, as it’s a new head gasket. The floor is open


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Nuclear engineer
02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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There are nine engine versions of E83 at least and proper bleeding depends on just which one you have. Here’s a common engine bleeding procedure, and and link to the E83 file for the other versions.

NewTIS said:
After the cooling system has been filled with the vacuum filling unit, another bleeding procedure must be performed for vehicles with an electric coolant pump: Note:
Do not open the coolant expansion tank sealing cap during the bleeding procedure.
Switch on the low-beam headlights to perform the bleeding procedure. If the low-beam headlights are not switched on, the ignition (Terminal 15) will switch off automatically after a certain period of time and interrupt the bleeding procedure.

  1. Connect battery charger.
  2. Switch the ignition on.
  3. Switch on low-beam headlight.
  4. Set heating to maximum temperature. Take back blower to smallest stage.
  5. Driving experience switch must not be set to ECO PRO!
  6. Press accelerator pedal for 10 seconds to floor. Engine must not be started.
  7. The bleeding procedure was started by pressing the accelerator pedal and takes approx. 12 min. (the electrical coolant pump was activated and switches off automatically after approx. 12 min).
  8. Then adjust filling level in coolant expansion tank to maximum.
  9. Check cooling system for leaks.
  10. If the cooling system bleeding has to be performed again, deactivate DME completely (remove ignition key for approx. 3 minutes). Then repeat from point 3.

I‘m sure some YouTube expert will be along to tell a better way.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I replaced the head gasket because i had refilled the coolant wrong during a routine coolant change and it overheated pretty bad. the hard hoses on the head were leaking and i figured the head gasket was probably bad and i was already all the way in there. the head wasn’t warped though, not to any noticeable degree with my feeler gauges anyway.
I had the correct psi reading across 6 cylinders when i was finished though. I’m not sure how to verify is the water pump is pumping but when i start the car, the coolant level dips down and when i have the bleeder screw off and the car running, coolant flows out at a pretty good rate so those are the two best indicators I have. I’ve had the pump off a few times now and it visually looks fine.


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Discussion Starter #5
I’ve never heard anything like those instructions but it gives me a little hope that maybe there are things yet to try.


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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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Mechanical or electrical water pump? Electrical pumps are incredibly fragile.
NewTIS said:
RISK OF DAMAGE
Non-visible damage to the coolant pump.

Forcibly removing, installing or dropping the coolant pump down will damage it.
Remove and install the coolant pump without damaging it and without applying external force.
Avoid impacts/knocks to the coolant pump (e.g.. by tools, falling down, hard contact with base).
Renew coolant pump after being dropped or hard impacts/knocks.
 

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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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I’ve never heard anything like those instructions but it gives me a little hope that maybe there are things yet to try.
Be careful! I don’t know which engine you have and those quoted instructions may not be for your engine.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I found the instructions for my car on the website and it says i need a vacuum vacuum coolant pump. Is that true? I will try to activate the electric coolant pump to see if my car has one, wish me luck. What are the odds it’s a cylinder leaking gasses into the coolant system ?


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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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Vacuum for filling, not bleeding. What engine have you?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have the 3.0 with AWD no navigation. I should probably get the ViN number off the car to make sure. I know the vacuum is for filling, but can i fill it up with coolant a different way and expect results from the bleeding process?


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02/2012 X5 35d M57Y CPO 98K miles NOKIAN WR G3 12K miles
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No. Vacuum filling draws a vacuum in cooling system voids that have no flow through them to vent the trapped air, then the coolant is sucked up into the void.


Vacuum fill is how many reactor plant cooling systems are filled for that reason (and to minimize dissolved oxygen in the cooling water that causes rust).

A large part of my job was planning fill and vent of subsystems, requiring detailed knowledge of vent path heights. Fill until water ran out of lowest vent then shut it. Fill until water runs out of next highest vent and shut it. Continue until high point vent bleeds air free water and shut it.

Hmmm, I wonder if many - all - of the cooling problems below in Recommended Reading aren’t due to shadetrees avoiding this instruction and method out of ignorance?
 

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Tanner you have an M series engine and a mechanical pump.

I’d be suspect of head warpage.

Check that the two rad hoses aren’t the same temp; the lower should be much cooler. If they’re the same temp, you likely have a bad water pump or clogged radiator.




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Discussion Starter #13
Yep i’m %90 sure it’s head related. looks like i’ll be checking my head for cracks and warps this weekend. Does anybody have the M10 threaded time-serf kit i could borrow?? I’m looking to buy one but it’s rather outrageous for a one-time use. I’d pay fat shipping both ways! I noticed two of the head bolts giving out last time i did a head job that’s why i ask. I’ll post an update once i get the head off :)


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Pressure test cylinders and cooling system before yanking the head. You can weld, so make a cylinder pressurizing tool to test at TDC and BDC (just to rule out cracked liner/wall). Take an old spark plug, knock the center out, weld a male air chuck to it with a T and a valve to attach a pressure gauge and isolate the tool, and attach a hose from the air compressor. Pressurize to 70psi and shut valve. Watch for bleed down. You don’t need to know acceptable allowance, you’re looking for the 1-2 outliers. Leave the coolant cap off and you should hear/see bubbling too if there’s a leak into a cooling jacket.

Edit: just saw the bolt issue. If you have bolt issues, you have clamping issues, and you you have sealing issues. Start by testing those cylinders.


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Discussion Starter #15
i deep cleaned the shop so i could pull the car in and leave it for a week so i can take it apart and order what i need. it’s a new head gasket but i’m thinking i should order some of the copper head gasket spray sir when i reassemble, good or bad idea? i’m gonna pressure test tonight i welded up the pressure tester and put epoxy over it just in case my welds had a leak so now i’m waiting for that to cure. I plugged my code reader in and just got a cylinder 3 misfire which is where the suspect head bolt is so i’m fully expecting cylinder 3 to fail the pressure test. will i need to order the larger head gasket if i decide to get the head machines or is the stock size okay still? Last question, how do i look for cracks and if there are any will i need to find a whole new head? Thanks for all the help!


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Discussion Starter #16
sorry I need to start proofreading lol
sir>>for*
machines>>machined
and I was referring to looking for cracks in the head itself


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Oversized head gasket depends on the need for milling. In old muscle car realms, most head gaskets come at a larger compressed thickness to account for necessary milling on a 40 yr old engine. Using a few thousandths thicker HG with no milling drops compression enough to be a noticeable loss in power.

Don’t buy a HG until you know if you need to milk the head. Also make sure to use a straight edge or glass to make sure the deck is true. If it isn’t you’ll need to pull the engine to deck the block.

Use an online compression calculator to play around and figure out what you might need, but don’t order parts until you know what you do need.


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