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///M 'n it up!
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The inside of the back driver's side tire on my car wears much faster than the outside. Here is a list of what I know.

  • I've had the car aligned twice at two different shops, both of which claimed the car was perfectly aligned before they got it.
  • The car has as a slight steering wheel alignment problem, where the steering wheel must be about 3 degrees to the right for the car to go straight. The alignment shops said they checked the steering alignment as well.
  • No other tires have uneven wear.
  • The previous owner mounted 225/45s all the way around, and put the rear rims on the front. So the front tires walls were streched and loopsided inward. This was fixed a year ago when I purchased the car.
  • I havn't discovered any of the rear diff or subframe tearing issues, and it doesn't appear the car ever had the problem (no signs of patch work, or fixing).
  • The car has 65k miles on its stock suspension.

Any suggestions?
 

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tire pressure? With everything else you've checked I'm sure you already checked your pressures, but I thought I'd throw it out there anyways.
 

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///M 'n it up!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tire pressure? With everything else you've checked I'm sure you already checked your pressures, but I thought I'd throw it out there anyways.
Yea, I check tire pressures every other week.

This problem has occured over two sets of tires.
 

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Equine 1/4 miler ancestor
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Has the rear alignment been checked? It may not be adjustable, but it can be off because of a bent trailing arm or subframe -- that can impact rear toe and camber, causing rapid and uneven tire wear.
 

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///M 'n it up!
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Has the rear alignment been checked?
Are you saying beyond the normal alignment job? No, I havn't specifically had any of the suspension components checked. I have had the local BMW dealership up under the car for a pre-purchase inspection, and several other odds and ends jobs that would require them to be in and around the rear suspension. They never said anything looked suspicious.

I have also been up under the car, and havn't seen anything that struck me as odd, though I'm certainly not a certified mechanic. I don't know enough about the purpose of individual suspension components, but would a bad bushing cause something like that?
 

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The 3.0 with sport suspension has considerable negative camber in the rear, and of course some toe-in (some static, more dynamic). The result: inside rear tire wear. No adjustments in the rear in stock form; you get what you get. Your options are raise the rear (thicker spring pads), Ireland toe and camber kits, eccentric rear trailing arm bushings, or rotating the tires. Of all of the options, the Ireland solution is the best option for the long haul (so the rear can be reliably aligned). That's why it's on my car.
 

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///M 'n it up!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The 3.0 with sport suspension...
I didn't know there was a sport v.s. normal suspension option. Any way I can tell if I have the sports suspension?

My biggest concern is that it happens on the driver's side rear tire, and not on the passenger's side rear tire.
 

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Just one tire is probably a bent trailing arm. That would throw off the thrust angle and cause the steering problem you mentioned.

What are the alignment numbers right now? My guess is that the rear driver side wheel is toed-in too far. Possibly from being hit from the rear.

Note that in stock form there's diddly you can do about a bent trailing arm other than replace it. If it were me, I'd have the Ireland kits installed at that time so the rear can be re-aligned in the future.

Not owning a 3.0, I don't know what all came with the sport package that would be giveaways. You don't have the original window sticker, etc.?
 

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I didn't know there was a sport v.s. normal suspension option. Any way I can tell if I have the sports suspension?

My biggest concern is that it happens on the driver's side rear tire, and not on the passenger's side rear tire.
Sport suspension came with cross spoke wheels.
 

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///M 'n it up!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just one tire is probably a bent trailing arm. That would throw off the thrust angle and cause the steering problem you mentioned.

What are the alignment numbers right now? My guess is that the rear driver side wheel is toed-in too far. Possibly from being hit from the rear.

Note that in stock form there's diddly you can do about a bent trailing arm other than replace it. If it were me, I'd have the Ireland kits installed at that time so the rear can be re-aligned in the future.

Not owning a 3.0, I don't know what all came with the sport package that would be giveaways. You don't have the original window sticker, etc.?
Thanks for that info. I am going to do a quick visual inspection of the trailing arm this week and go from there. I found a couple other of your posts with good info on the Ie kit. I am just nervous I'll screw up the alignment even more if I did the kit install. But I guess I've got to learn someday :)

thanks!
 

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I agree with Daniel that the IE plates are the way to go.

I had over 3 degrees of neg camber on my Z and I had the IE plates installed. Now being able to adjust the alignment has made my Z almost new in its ride and handling. BTW I tried adjustable bushings and they kept going out of adjustment so I had them removed. If long term ownership is your plan go for the best fix.

PS it ain't a cheap fix but it is the best.
 

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Inquiring mind
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Your options are raise the rear (thicker spring pads), Ireland toe and camber kits, eccentric rear trailing arm bushings, or rotating the tires. Of all of the options, the Ireland solution is the best option for the long haul (so the rear can be reliably aligned). That's why it's on my car.
Do you have the IE part number for the kit? non M

Thanks in advance...:thumbup:
 

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I turned off all my cookie controls and still can not access the nexternal.com site.
Do you have another site or the part numbers I can look up??
Thanks
CarlM
Ireland's main website is [URL="http://www.bmw2002.com]http://www.bmw2002.com[/URL]

Click on Catalog, then the links I mentioned before.
 

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Inquiring mind
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I took the long way around the mountian but I got to the correct location and found the parts. How much welding is involved??
While I'm there "welding" I guess I should consider a dual eared diff??

On a non M does the dual ear diff mean a lot or correct any deficencies?????
 

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I took the long way around the mountian but I got to the correct location and found the parts. How much welding is involved??
While I'm there "welding" I guess I should consider a dual eared diff??

On a non M does the dual ear diff mean a lot or correct any deficencies?????
Welding for the Ireland toe and camber kits is not much; weld 4 small pieces to the existing trailing arm brackets (8 pieces total) after grinding the stock bolt holes into ovals. Randy used the MIG on mine. Most of the work is getting the rear subframe out and back in; I brought the subframe to him so he didn't have to do the removal and installation.

All of these cars are susceptible to the trunk pan, crossmember and differential mount issues. We've seen a 1.9 that got bad enough that the crossmember completely severed. Keep a good eye on it, do the Randy Forbes fix when it needs it. While Randy can certainly do all of it for you, the Ireland toe and camber kits aren't much shop work for a shop familiar with these cars or E30's. If you don't have the Ireland rear subframe bushings, those would definitely be something to do along with the Ireland toe and camber kits, since the subframe needs to come out.
 

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I bought a 1999 BMW 2.3 z3 last year. Mine has also has rear alignment issues and I hope someone can help. It had excessive neg camber, so I replaced the four trailing arm bushings (w/ OEM) and both subframe bushings with polyurethane. I also installed the Ireland Engineering kits for camber and toe adjustment. I put the bottom of the camber slots centered in the original bolt holes to maximize the reduction in negative camber and centered the toe slot on the original bolt hole on the trailing arm. I also replaced both rear shocks and springs with aftermarket parts. I thought it all went well until I went to the alignment shop. The shop was able to adjust the brackets, but said there wasn't enough adjustment to get the car into specification. The Drivers Rear started at -1.9° camber and -0.08° toe and ended up at -1.9° camber and -0.05° toe. The Pass Rear started at -1.3° camber and -0.89° toe and ended up at -1.8° camber and -0.42° toe. The technician said that I need another 0.25" slot adjustment to get the rear toe in spec. I really wanted to reduce the negative camber a little more too. The front camber ended up at -2.4° / -2.2° and the front toe ended up at 0.46° / 0.02°. It appears I may need to drop the rear end again and try to extend the IE plates. The car does not appear to have been damaged, so I do not suspect bent parts. I am a weekend / rookie mechanic, but thought I installed all part correctly. Any suggestions?
 
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